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Short-term effects of relaxation music on patients suffering from primary open-angle glaucoma

Authors Bertelmann T, Strempel I

Received 17 May 2015

Accepted for publication 31 July 2015

Published 22 October 2015 Volume 2015:9 Pages 1981—1988

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S88732

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Yang Liu

Peer reviewer comments 3

Editor who approved publication: Dr Scott Fraser


Thomas Bertelmann, Ilse Strempel

Department of Ophthalmology, Philipps-University Marburg, Baldingerstraβe, Marburg, Germany

Purpose: To evaluate whether additive relaxation music (RM) has an adjuvant short-term effect on physiological and psychological parameters in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma.
Methods: Prospective, randomized clinical trial. Patients in the therapy group (TG) received a 30-minute RM via headphones, whereas members of the control group (CG) did not. Best corrected visual acuity, intraocular pressure, visual field testing, short- and long-term mental states, and blood levels of different stress hormones were analyzed and compared.
Results: A total of 25 (61%)/16 (39%) patients were assigned to the TG/CG. Best corrected visual acuity, daily intraocular pressure, and short-term mental state (KAB) development were significantly better in the TG in comparison to controls. Visual field testing, long-term mental well-being (profile of mood states), and adrenalin, cortisol, and endothelin-I blood levels did not differ significantly between both groups.
Conclusion: Additive RM applied on a daily basis can positively impact various physiological and psychological parameters in the short term.

Keywords: primary open angle glaucoma, POAG, music therapy, intraocular pressure, IOP, mental health
 
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