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Sequential Keraring implantation and corneal cross-linking for the treatment of keratoconus in children with vernal keratoconjunctivitis

Authors Abozaid MA

Received 25 August 2017

Accepted for publication 27 September 2017

Published 24 October 2017 Volume 2017:11 Pages 1891—1895

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S150022

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Colin Mak

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Dr Scott Fraser

Mortada A Abozaid

Ophthalmology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Sohag University, Sohag, Egypt

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the safety and efficacy of femtosecond laser-assisted Keraring implantation followed by transepithelial accelerated corneal collagen cross-linking (CXL) for the treatment of keratoconus in children with vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC).
Study design: This is a prospective interventional non-comparative case series.
Patients and methods: Eighteen eyes of 11 children with keratoconus and VKC were included in this study. All the cases were treated with femtosecond laser-assisted Keraring implantation followed after 2 weeks by transepithelial accelerated CXL, and the patients were followed up for 1 year.
Results: The preoperative mean uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA) was 1.01±0.2 (logMAR), whereas the postoperative mean UCVA was 0.6±0.2. The preoperative mean best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was 0.6±0.1, whereas the postoperative mean BCVA was 0.40±0.2. The preoperative average keratometry was 50.3±2.7 D, whereas the postoperative average keratometry was 45.8±3.1 D.
Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that femtosecond laser-assisted Keraring implantation followed by CXL is safe and effective in the management of keratoconus in children with VKC. However, studies with a longer follow-up period are needed.

Keywords: cross-linking plus, intrastromal corneal ring segments, pediatric keratoconus, spring catarrh

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