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Renal thrombotic microangiopathy caused by interferon beta-1a treatment for multiple sclerosis

Authors Mahe J, Meurette A, Moreau A, Vercel C, Jolliet P

Received 28 December 2012

Accepted for publication 2 April 2013

Published 7 August 2013 Volume 2013:7 Pages 723—728

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/DDDT.S42138

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 5


Julien Mahe,1 Aurélie Meurette,2 Anne Moreau,3 Caroline Vercel,2 Pascale Jolliet1,4

1Clinical Pharmacology Department, Institute of Biology, University Hospital, Nantes, France; 2Clinical Nephrology and Immunology Department, University Hospital, Nantes, France; 3Laboratory of Pathology, University Hospital, Nantes, France; 4EA 4275 Biostatistics, Pharmacoepidemiology and Subjective Measures in Health Sciences, University of Nantes, Nantes, France

Abstract: Interferon beta-1a is available as an immunomodulating agent for relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis. Common side effects include flu-like symptoms, asthenia, anorexia, and administration site reaction. Kidney disorders are rarely reported. In this study we describe the case of a woman who has been undergoing treatment with interferon beta-1a for multiple sclerosis for 5 years. She developed a hemolytic-uremic syndrome with intravascular hemolysis in a context of severe hypertension. A kidney biopsy showed a thrombotic microangiopathy. This observation highlights an uncommon side effect of long-term interferon beta-1a therapy. Pathophysiological mechanisms leading to this complication might be explained by the antiangiogenic activity of interferon.

Keywords: thrombotic microangiopathy, interferon beta, hemolytic-uremic syndrome, antiangiogenic activity

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