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Refractive surgery or contact lenses – how and when to decide?

Authors Xu K, Jhanji V

Published 11 November 2011 Volume 2011:3 Pages 63—72


Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 2

Kunyong Xu1, Vishal Jhanji2
1Michael G DeGroote School of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada; 2Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

Abstract: Correction of refractive errors can be achieved with spectacles, contact lenses, and refractive surgery. The past decade has seen a surge in the availability of alternatives for patients and surgeons in terms of both surgical and nonsurgical options for the management of refractive errors. Newer generation contact lenses provide enhanced safety and better handling, whereas modern-day refractive surgery presents a plethora of choices based on the clinical characteristics and requirements of patients. We have moved from an era of "one size fits all" to a purely customized way of treating patients with refractive errors. This review presents the background, advantages, and disadvantages of the two most commonly used options for correction of ametropia, ie, contact lenses and refractive surgery.

Keywords: laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis, contact lens, patient selection, complications, outcomes

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