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Rare case of fungal keratitis caused by Plectosporium tabacinum

Authors Kamada R, Monden Y, Uehara, Yamakawa R, Nishimura

Received 24 July 2012

Accepted for publication 3 August 2012

Published 5 October 2012 Volume 2012:6 Pages 1623—1627

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S36318

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 2


Rika Kamada,1 Yu Monden,1 Koji Uehara,1 Ryoji Yamakawa,1 Kazuko Nishimura2

1Department of Ophthalmology, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume, Fukuoka, 2Medical Mycology Research Center, Chiba University and First Laboratories Co, Ltd, Kawasaki, Kanagawa, Japan

Abstract: A rare case of fungal keratitis caused by Plectosporium tabacinum is reported. A 78-year-old female gardener presented with conjunctivitis and an oval infiltrate with irregular margins in the nasal half of the cornea in the right eye. Light microscopy of corneal scrapings revealed a filamentous fungus, and a diagnosis of fungal keratitis was made. The patient was admitted into our hospital on February 19, 2008. Treatment with topical miconazole, topical fluconazole, pimaricin ointment, intravenous miconazole, and corneal debridement was commenced. One week later, the infiltrate improved, but the central part of the infiltrate was still deep. Topical fluconazole was switched to topical voriconazole, and intravenous miconazole was switched to intravenous voriconazole. One month after admission, the causative organism was identified by morphology and molecular biological analysis as Plectosporium tabacinum. The corneal infiltrate resolved 3 months after admission. A stromal scar persisted for 3 months after the patient was discharged. This is the first detailed report of fungal keratitis caused by P. tabacinum. Voriconazole was effective in treating this refractory keratitis.

Keywords: fungal keratitis, Plectosporium tabacinum, voriconazole, filamentous fungi

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