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Randomized controlled trial of Micro-Mobile Compression® on lactate clearance and subsequent exercise performance in elite male cyclists

Authors San Millan I, Bing K, Brill C, Hill J, Miller LE

Received 23 July 2013

Accepted for publication 24 August 2013

Published 16 October 2013 Volume 2013:4 Pages 221—227

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/OAJSM.S51956

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 4


Iñigo San Millán,1 Kristen Bing,1 Carrie Brill,1 John C Hill,1 Larry E Miller2

1University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO, 2Miller Scientific Consulting, Inc, Arden, NC, USA

Background: The purpose of this paper was to assess the feasibility of Micro-Mobile Compression® (MMC) on lactate clearance following exhaustive exercise and on subsequent exercise performance.
Methods: Elite male cyclists were randomized to MMC (n = 8) or passive recovery (control, n = 8). MMC is incorporated into a sandal that intermittently compresses the venous plexus during non-weight bearing to augment venous return. On day 1, subjects performed a graded exercise test on a cycle ergometer followed by 60 minutes of seated recovery, with or without MMC. Blood lactate concentration ([La¯]) was measured during exercise and recovery. Subjects returned home for 3 more hours of seated recovery, with or without MMC. On days 2 and 3, subjects exercised to exhaustion in a fixed-load cycle ergometer test at 85% peak power and then repeated the day 1 post-exercise recovery procedures. Lactate clearance data after the time to exhaustion tests on days 2 and 3 were averaged to adjust for interday variation.
Results: On the day after MMC or control recovery, mean time to exhaustion was 15% longer (mean difference, 2.1 minutes) in the MMC group (P = 0.30). The standardized mean difference of MMC for time to exhaustion was 0.55, defined as a moderate treatment effect. Following the graded exercise test, area under the 60-minute lactate curve was nonsignificantly lower with MMC (3.2 ± 0.4 millimolar [mM]) versus control (3.5 ± 0.4 mM, P = 0.10) and times from end of exercise to 4mM and 2mM were 2.1 minutes (P = 0.58) and 7.2 minutes (P = 0.12) shorter, although neither achieved statistical significance. Following time to exhaustion testing, the area under the 60-minute lactate curve was lower with MMC (3.2 ± 0.2 mM) versus control (3.5 ± 0.2 mM, P = 0.02) and times from end of exercise to 4mM and 2mM were 4.4 minutes (P = 0.02) and 7.6 minutes (P < 0.01) faster. The standardized mean difference of MMC on most lactate clearance parameters was >0.8, defined as a large treatment effect.
Conclusion: MMC yields large treatment effects on lactate clearance following high-intensity exercise and moderate treatment effects on subsequent exercise performance in elite male cyclists.

Keywords: cycling, graded exercise test, recovery, time to exhaustion, venous return

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