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Quality of life in preoperative patients with sacroiliac joint dysfunction is at least as depressed as in other lumbar spinal conditions

Authors Cher D, Reckling WC

Received 9 July 2015

Accepted for publication 4 August 2015

Published 16 September 2015 Volume 2015:8 Pages 395—403

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/MDER.S92070

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single anonymous peer review

Peer reviewer comments 4

Editor who approved publication: Dr Scott Fraser


Video abstract presented by Daniel Cher

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Daniel Joseph Cher, W Carlton Reckling

SI-BONE, Inc., San Jose, CA, USA

Background: Pain from the sacroiliac joint (SIJ) is an under-recognized cause of low back pain. The degree to which SIJ pain decreases quality of life has not been directly compared to other more familiar conditions of the lumbar spine.
Methods: Multivariate regression analysis of individual patient data from two prospective multicenter clinical trials of SIJ fusion and three prospective multicenter clinical trials of surgical treatments for degenerative lumbar spine conditions.
Results: Controlling for baseline demographic parameters as well as a validated disability score, quality of life scores (EuroQOL 5-D and SF-36) were, in most cases, lower in the SIJ cohorts compared to the three other spine surgery cohorts.
Conclusion: Patients with SIJ dysfunction considering surgery have decrements in quality of life as or more severe compared to patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis, spinal stenosis, and intervertebral disc herniation.

Keywords: spine surgery, disability, low back pain, sacroiliac joint pain, lumbar stenosis, intervertebral disc herniation, degenerative spondylolisthesis, sacroiliac joint fusion

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