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Quality of Informed Consent Among Patients Who Underwent Major Surgical Procedure in a Tertiary Care Hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Authors Chane W, Birhanu B, Suga Y

Received 19 February 2020

Accepted for publication 14 April 2020

Published 6 May 2020 Volume 2020:13 Pages 27—33

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/OAS.S250532

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Professor Luigi Bonavina


Wuletaw Chane,1 Bethlehem Birhanu,2 Yisihak Suga1

1Department of Surgery, St. Paul’s Hospital Millennium Medical College, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia; 2St. Paul’s Hospital Millennium Medical College, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Correspondence: Wuletaw Chane
Department of Surgery, St. Paul’s Hospital Millennium Medical College, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Email wulexc@gmail.com

Background: Informed consent is the process by which a patient learns about and understands the purpose, benefits, and potential risks of a medical or surgical intervention and then agrees to receive the treatment. It is a legally required process before performing any medical or surgical procedure. In most setups where surgical services are being provided, most components of informed consent are not always complete. The aim of this study is to assess the quality of informed consent among surgical patients admitted to the surgical ward of SPHMMC (St. Paul’s Hospital Millennium Medical College) from March 4 to April 12, 2019, G.C.
Methods and Materials: This is an institution-based prospective cross-sectional study done on patients admitted to the surgical ward of SPHMMC from March 4 to April 12, 2019, G.C. A total of  135 patients were selected by simple random sampling and were interviewed after their surgeries and before discharge.
Results: The informed consent form does not have any of the essential components of surgical informed consent. Out of 135 respondents, only 8.1% of the patients received the minimum required components of informed consent (a good quality informed consent). 85.9% were told their diagnosis, 55.6% knew the benefits of the surgery, and 60.7% knew the consequences of not doing the surgery. Only 26.7% of respondents received explanations about the risk of the procedure. 44.4% of patients were told alternative options of treatment.
Conclusion: The quality of informed consent is poor in the surgical ward of SPHMMC. The hospital administration (surgical department) should develop a protocol on the amount of information disclosed to patients before surgery and train all medical personnel.

Keywords: informed, consent, quality

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