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Pulse pressure variation and pleth variability index as predictors of fluid responsiveness in patients undergoing spinal surgery in the prone position

Authors Kim DH, Shin S, Kim JY, Kim SH, Jo M, Choi YS

Received 7 April 2018

Accepted for publication 3 June 2018

Published 6 July 2018 Volume 2018:14 Pages 1175—1183

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/TCRM.S170395

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Cristina Weinberg

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Professor Garry Walsh


Do-Hyeong Kim,1 Seokyung Shin,1 Ji Young Kim,1 Seung Hyun Kim,2 Minju Jo,2 Yong Seon Choi1

1Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Anesthesia and Pain Research Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 2Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea

Background: This study investigated the ability of pulse pressure variation (PPV) and pleth variability index (PVI) to predict fluid responsiveness of patients undergoing spinal surgery in the prone position.
Patients and methods: A total of 53 patients undergoing posterior lumbar spinal fusion in the prone position on a Jackson table were studied. PPV, PVI, and hemodynamic and respiratory variables were measured both before and after the administration of 6 mL/kg colloid in both the supine and prone positions. Fluid responsiveness was defined as a 15% or greater increase in stroke volume index, as assessed by esophageal Doppler monitor after fluid loading.
Results: In the supine position, 40 patients were responders. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves for PPV and PVI were 0.783 [95% CI 0.648–0.884, P<0.001] and 0.814 (95% CI 0.684–0.908, P<0.001), respectively. The optimal cut-off values of PPV and PVI were 10% (sensitivity 75%, specificity 62%) and 8% (sensitivity 78%, specificity 77%), respectively. In the prone position, 27 patients were responders. The areas under the ROC curves for PPV and PVI were 0.781 (95% CI 0.646–0.883, P<0.001) and 0.756 (95% CI 0.618–0.863, P<0.001), respectively. The optimal cut-off values of PPV and PVI were 7% (sensitivity 82%, specificity 62%) and 8% (sensitivity 67%, specificity 69%), respectively.
Conclusion: Both PPV and PVI were able to predict fluid responsiveness; their predictive abilities were maintained in the prone position.

Keywords: fluid therapy, intraoperative monitoring, prone position, stroke volume

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