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Psychological Impact of COVID-19 Cases on Medical Staff of Beijing Xiaotangshan Hospital

Authors Fu Y, Wang M, Zhao B, Liu B, Sun J, Feng Y, Wang Z, Li Q, Shi C, Xuan Y, Long S, Liu H, Chi T, Liao Z, Li B, Liu Q

Received 20 October 2020

Accepted for publication 5 December 2020

Published 18 January 2021 Volume 2021:14 Pages 41—47

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/PRBM.S287842

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single anonymous peer review

Peer reviewer comments 3

Editor who approved publication: Professor Igor Elman


Yuanbo Fu,1,* Mina Wang,1,2,* Bingcong Zhao,1,* Baoli Liu,3 Jie Sun,4 Yaohui Feng,3 Zhengfang Wang,3 Qian Li,3 Chunhong Shi,3 Yabo Xuan,3 Siqi Long,3 Huan Liu,4 Tiange Chi,5 Zehuan Liao,6,7 Bin Li,1 Qingquan Liu3

1The Department of Acupuncture and Moxibustion, Beijing Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Capital Medical University, Beijing Key Laboratory of Acupuncture Neuromodulation, Beijing 100010, People’s Republic of China; 2Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing 100029, People’s Republic of China; 3Beijing Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100010, People’s Republic of China; 4Beijing Xiao Tang Shan Hospital, Beijing 102200, People’s Republic of China; 5The First Clinical Medical School, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing 100029, People’s Republic of China; 6School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637551, Singapore; 7Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology (MTC), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm 17177, Sweden

*These authors contributed equally to this work

Correspondence: Bin Li
Beijing Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Capital Medical University, Beijing Key Laboratory of Acupuncture Neuromodulation, No. 23 Gallery Street, Beijing 100010, People’s Republic of China
Email libin0314a@126.com
Qingquan Liu
Beijing Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Capital Medical University, No. 23 Gallery Street, Beijing 100010, People’s Republic of China
Email liuqingquan2003@126.com

Purpose: To investigate the psychological impact of cases of coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) on medical staff of Beijing Xiaotangshan Hospital.
Methods: The 287 online questionnaires were distributed to medical staff working at Beijing Xiaotangshan Hospital, comprising three main sections and 17 questions: basic information, current departmental position, and the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12). The threshold for emotional distress was defined to be a total score of 4 on the GHQ-12 and above.
Results: A total of 255 members of medical staff participating in this study presented an emotional distress rate of 17%. Members who were male, aged 50– 59, married with children, positioned as doctors, and in administration were the population with the highest rate of emotional distress. Furthermore, the severity of emotional distress among those under 30 was significantly lower than those aged 30– 39 and 50– 59. Doctors and other occupations shared a lower level of satisfaction on routine activities compared with nurses, so did staff in the administration compared with those who were working in screening or logistic departments. Besides, males and staff of the confirmation department had more difficulty in concentrating than females and those of the screening department, respectively.
Conclusion: Medical staff working at Xiaotangshan Hospital underwent relatively low levels of emotional distress thanks to sufficient medical and psychological preparations. However, special attention should be paid to those who were male, married with children, senior, doctors, in administration, and in the confirmation department.

Keywords: COVID-19, psychological impact, medical staff, Beijing, GHQ-12

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