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Prolonged increase in tear meniscus height by 3% diquafosol ophthalmic solution in eyes with contact lenses

Authors Nagahara Y, Koh S, Nishida K, Watanabe H

Received 6 April 2015

Accepted for publication 13 May 2015

Published 9 June 2015 Volume 2015:9 Pages 1029—1031

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S86173

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Dr Scott Fraser


Yukiko Nagahara,1 Shizuka Koh,1 Kohji Nishida,1 Hitoshi Watanabe1,2

1Department of Ophthalmology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka, 2Kansai Rosai Hospital, Amagasaki, Hyogo, Japan

Purpose: This study aimed to evaluate the increase in tear meniscus height (TMH) induced by 3% diquafosol ophthalmic solution in eyes with contact lens (CL).
Methods: Ten healthy subjects wearing high-water-content CLs received topical instillation of two ophthalmic solutions – 3% diquafosol ophthalmic solution in one eye and artificial tears in the other eye. Lower TMH was measured at 5 minutes, 10 minutes, 15 minutes, 30 minutes, and 60 minutes after instillation by anterior segment optical coherence tomography.
Results: TMH increased significantly (P<0.001) at 5 minutes and 15 minutes after instillation of saline compared with the baseline values. After instillation of 3% diquafosol ophthalmic solution, TMH significantly increased (P<0.05) at 5 minutes, 15 minutes, 30 minutes, and 60 minutes compared with the baseline values. Increases in TMH after diquafosol instillation were significantly greater (P<0.05) at 15 minutes, 30 minutes, and 60 minutes than increases in TMH after saline instillation.
Conclusion: Topical instillation of 3% diquafosol ophthalmic solution increases TMH for up to 60 minutes in eyes with high-water-content CLs.

Keywords: diquafosol ophthalmic solution, tear meniscus height, dry eye, contact lenses, tear film

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