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Progress in antiretroviral drug delivery using nanotechnology

Authors Rama Mallipeddi, Lisa Cencia Rohan

Published 22 July 2010 Volume 2010:5 Pages 533—547

DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IJN.S7681

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Peer reviewer comments 3

Rama Mallipeddi, Lisa Cencia Rohan
University of Pittsburgh, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, Magee Womens Research Institute, Pittsburgh, PA, USA

Abstract: There are currently a number of antiretroviral drugs that have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for use in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). More recently, antiretrovirals are being evaluated in the clinic for prevention of HIV infection. Due to the challenging nature of treatment and prevention of this disease, the use of nanocarriers to achieve more efficient delivery of antiretroviral drugs has been studied. Various forms of nanocarriers, such as nanoparticles (polymeric, inorganic, and solid lipid), liposomes, polymeric micelles, dendrimers, cyclodextrins, and cell-based nanoformulations have been studied for delivery of drugs intended for HIV prevention or therapy. The aim of this review is to provide a summary of the application of nanocarrier systems to the delivery of anti-HIV drugs, specifically antiretrovirals. For anti-HIV drugs to be effective, adequate distribution to specific sites in the body must be achieved, and effective drug concentrations must be maintained at those sites for the required period of time. Nanocarriers provide a means to overcome cellular and anatomical barriers to drug delivery. Their application in the area of HIV prevention and therapy may lead to the development of more effective drug products for combating this pandemic disease.

Keywords: drug delivery, HIV, antiretrovirals, nanoparticles, liposomes, dendrimers

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