Back to Journals » Patient Preference and Adherence » Volume 13

Prevalence and Risk Factors of Immunosuppressant Nonadherence in Heart Transplant Recipients: A Single-Center Cross-Sectional Study

Authors Zhang M, Zhou H, Nelson RS, Han Y, Wang Y, Xiang H, Cai J, Zhang J, Yuan Y

Received 19 July 2019

Accepted for publication 9 December 2019

Published 20 December 2019 Volume 2019:13 Pages 2185—2193

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/PPA.S223837

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single anonymous peer review

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Dr Naifeng Liu


Min Zhang,1,2,* Hong Zhou,2,* Ryan S Nelson,3 Yong Han,2 Yirong Wang,1,2 Hongping Xiang,2 Jie Cai,4 Jing Zhang,4 Yonghua Yuan1

1Department of Pharmacy, Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Child Development and Disorders, National Clinical Research Center for Child Health and Disorders, China International Science and Technology Cooperation Base of Child Development and Critical Disorders, Chongqing Key Laboratory of Pediatrics, Children’s Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400014, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Pharmacy, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Individualized Cancer Management, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL 33612, USA; 4Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022, People’s Republic of China

*These authors contributed equally to this work

Correspondence: Yonghua Yuan
Department of Pharmacy, Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Child Development and Disorders, National Clinical Research Center for Child Health and Disorders, China International Science and Technology Cooperation Base of Child Development and Critical Disorders, Chongqing Key Laboratory of Pediatrics, Children’s Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, No. 136 Zhongshan Er Road, Yuzhong District, Chongqing 400014, People’s Republic of China
Tel +86-023-68485161
Email 400766@cqmu.edu.cn

Background: Immunosuppressant nonadherence (INA) has been shown to affect outcomes after solid organ transplantation. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of INA in heart transplant recipients and the associated risk factors of INA.
Methods: Adult heart transplant recipients who firstly received heart transplantation (discharged for at least 3 months) were consecutively enrolled. Immunosuppressant adherence was assessed using the Basel Assessment of Adherence with Immunosuppressive Medication Scale (BAASIS). INA was categorized into five domains of contributing factors (socio-demographic factors, transplant-related factors, healthcare system access factors, post-transplant treatment-related factors, and patient-related psychosocial factors). These factors were compared between adherent and nonadherent patients. The risk factors of INA were investigated by logistic regression analysis.
Results: A total of 168 heart recipients were ultimately included. Among them, 69 (41.1%) recipients were revealed to be nonadherent. Logistic regression analysis indicated that INA was associated with monthly income<3000 Chinese Yuan (CNY) (OR, 3.11; 95% CI, 1.58–6.12; p=0.001), number of prescribed concomitant drugs (OR, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.12–1.50; p=0.003) and concerns about immunosuppressants (OR, 1.09; 95% CI, 1.01–1.18; p=0.031).
Conclusions: Heart recipients had a high prevalence of INA. Lower income, greater number of prescribed concomitant drugs, and more concerns about immunosuppressants correlated most with timing nonadherence and taking nonadherence among heart recipients. These findings will be helpful to intervene on and prevent future INA of heart recipients.

Keywords: heart transplantation, immunosuppressants, adherence, risk factors, interventions

Creative Commons License This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution - Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License. By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. For permission for commercial use of this work, please see paragraphs 4.2 and 5 of our Terms.

Download Article [PDF]  View Full Text [HTML][Machine readable]