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Practical issues in medication compliance in hypertensive patients

Authors Krzesinski J, Leeman

Published 23 June 2011 Volume 2011:2 Pages 63—70


Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 2

Jean-Marie Krzesinski1, Marc Leeman2
1Nephrology Transplantation Department, Domaine Universitaire, Liège, Belgium; 2Department of Internal Medicine and Hypertension Clinic, Erasme University Hospital, Brussels, Belgium

Abstract: Unsatisfactory compliance in the treatment of high blood pressure is frequently due to sequential barriers, such as insufficient patient education about the illness and low motivation to receive any treatment, existence of a large gap between physicians' perceptions of the problem and clinical reality, complexity of the treatment potentially generating adverse effects, and a health care environment with few public education campaigns and incentives for better coordinated supportive care. In order to improve drug compliance, establishment of personalized plans adapted to each patient is required. First, a good doctor–patient relationship is mandatory, with regular education of the patient about hypertension and its risks, discussion about adverse drug effects, and the complexity and cost of treatment. Second, to have any chance of success, the provider should offer convenient appointments and tailor the treatment regimen to the patient's lifestyle and needs, with written instructions. Third, there is a need to promote active patient collaboration with treatment. An innovative combination of home self-measurement of blood pressure, use of new technology options, eg, texting or telemedicine, and creation of a multidisciplinary working team can offer new, effective opportunities. This approach could reduce cardiovascular complications by improving the control of high blood pressure, and thereby the overall costs of hypertension to the health care system.

Keywords: arterial hypertension, therapeutic adherence, drug compliance, persistence

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