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Potential of next-generation sequencing to match blood group antigens for transfusion

Authors Orzinska A, Guz K, Brojer E

Received 20 May 2019

Accepted for publication 30 July 2019

Published 3 September 2019 Volume 2019:7 Pages 11—22

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/IJCTM.S175142

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Prof. Dr. Cees Th. Smit Sibinga


Agnieszka Orzinska, Katarzyna Guz, Ewa Brojer

Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine, Department of Hematological and Transfusion Immunology, Warsaw, Poland

Correspondence: Agnieszka Orzinska
Department of Hematological and Transfusion Immunology, Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine, 14 Gandhi Street, Warsaw 02-776, Poland
Email aorzinska@ihit.waw.pl

Abstract: A review of the advances in applying next-generation sequencing (NGS) to transfusion medicine for the purpose of genotyping alleles encoding clinically important red blood cell and platelet antigens. NGS data from published studies confirm the possibility of antigen prediction based on sequencing of the whole genome, exome or targeted regions. What remains a challenge, to provide highly accurate NGS genotyping, is the further improvement of bioinformatic solutions for automated interpretation based on publicly accessible and improved reference databases appropriate for NGS methods as well as validation of a method based on the examination of a large number of individuals. There is no doubt, however, as to the future of NGS as a supplementary test used to provide highly compatible blood as well as to reduce the risk of patient’s alloimmunization. This is part of personalized medicine.

Keywords: alloimmunization, transfusion medicine, whole genome, exome, allele

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