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Osteosarcopenic Obesity Associated with Poor Physical Performance in the Elderly Chinese Community

Authors Ma Y, Zhang W, Han P, Kohzuki M, Guo Q

Received 24 April 2020

Accepted for publication 27 June 2020

Published 11 August 2020 Volume 2020:15 Pages 1343—1352

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/CIA.S257739

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single anonymous peer review

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Dr Zhi-Ying Wu


Yixuan Ma,1 Wen Zhang,1,2 Peipei Han,3 Masahiro Kohzuki,1 Qi Guo3

1Department of Internal Medicine and Rehabilitation Science, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan; 2Department of Rehabilitation and Sports Medicine, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Shanghai University of Medicine and Health Sciences, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China

Correspondence: Masahiro Kohzuki
Department of Internal Medicine and Rehabilitation Science, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Tohoku University, 1– 1 Seiryou-Cho, Aoba-Ku, Sendai 980– 8574, Japan
Email makohzuki@gmail.com
Qi Guo
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Shanghai University of Medicine and Health Sciences, No. 279 Zhouzhu Road, Pudong New Area, Shanghai 201318, People’s Republic of China
Tel/ Fax +86-22-8333-6977
Email guoqijp@gmail.com

Objective: The aims of this study were to investigate the association between osteosarcopenic obesity (OSO) and physical performance in Chinese elderly communities.
Methods: Our study population is comprised of residents of the Township Central Hospital in the suburban of Tianjin, China. Participants (n=303; percent body fat (PBF): ≥ 25% for men and ≥ 32% for women) were assessed using the direct segmental multi-frequency bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) for body composition. Sarcopenia was defined as the lower 20th percentile of appendicular skeletal muscle mass/height2 (ASMI). A quantitative ultrasound scan of each participants’ calcaneus with a T score≤− 1.0 was used to identify the prevalence of osteopenia/osteoporosis (OP). We divided people into four groups: obesity only (O), osteopenic obesity (OO), sarcopenic obesity (SO), and osteosarcopenic obesity (OSO). We assessed the physical performance by grip strength, 4-m walk test (WS) and timed up and go test (TUGT).
Results: A total of 303 participants had completed data (89 men, 214 women; mean age of 68.8± 6.0 years). The prevalence of OSO was 10.2% (men: 15.70%, women: 7.9%). After multiple adjustments, WS was significantly declined in OSO group when compared with the O group in men (mean value 95% CI was 0.84 (0.69, 0.99)) and women (mean value 95% CI was 0.93 (0.84, 1.02)). TUGT was significantly poorer in men (mean value 95% CI was 13.3 (10.6, 15.9)) and women (mean value 95% CI was 12.4 (11.2, 13.7)) with OSO when compared with the O group. Furthermore, the OSO group in women also had a significantly poorer TUGT compared with the OO group. The result of grip strength decreased significantly in women SO and OSO groups when compared with the O group (mean value 95% CI was 16.4 (14.5, 18.2) and 16.1 (13.9, 18.3)). But the results of grip strength in men showed no significant differences in any of the group.
Conclusion: In Chinese community-dwelling elderly, slower WS and lower balance function were associated with OSO in men and women. Lower grip strength was associated with SO and OSO in women.

Keywords: elder, osteosarcopenic obesity, physical performance

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