Back to Browse Journals » Nursing: Research and Reviews » Volume 1

Nursing around the world: a perspective on growing concerns and the shortage of care

Authors Vance DE

Published 9 November 2011 Volume 2011:1 Pages 9—14


Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 4

David E Vance
The University of Alabama School of Nursing, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA
Abstract: Many of us think of nurses as people who provide direct care to us and our loved ones. And that is true. Images of a selfless person such as Florence Nightingale during the Crimean War running from one wounded soldier to another providing care inspires the imagination of what a nurse is and can be. Based on that image, a nurse is anyone who cares (and from a spiritual or philosophical perspective, that may be true). But nursing as a profession is so much more. nurse is someone with a very selective skill set that can only be developed and honed by intense training, education, and discipline while being used in a proscribed ethical manner. With such a combination of skills, ethics, and caring, nurses are the backbone of health care settings, tending to the individual needs of the patients; however, many nurses also function outside such traditional settings and perform numerous functions. Nurses are educators and provide data to the public designed to improve health literacy and promote physical and mental wellness. Nurses are computer and organizational specialists who provide hospitals and institutions with the technologies for keeping, maintaining, and analyzing records. Nurses are clergy, psychologists, and philosophers providing a direction and a moral compass in how to are for patients and each other. Nurses are researchers investigating everything from developing medication for Alzheimer's disease to improving crop yields to reduce hunger. Finally, nurses are advocates and leaders petitioning for justice and beneficence of all regardless of gender, age, race, religion, sexual orientation, and nationality; and as such, nursing is political and has a global impact. Nursing is global in nature and is facing global, as well as country specific, problems. The purpose of this editorial is to provide a brief overview of what some of these problems are. As such, questions and possible solutions are considered.

Keywords: nursing shortage, aging, HIV, lifelong learning, exponential knowledge growth, limited resources, burnout

Creative Commons License This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution - Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License. By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. For permission for commercial use of this work, please see paragraphs 4.2 and 5 of our Terms.

Download Article [PDF] 


Other articles by this author:

Conducting an article critique for a quantitative research study: perspectives for doctoral students and other novice readers

Vance DE, Talley M, Azuero A, Pearce PF, Christian BJ

Nursing: Research and Reviews 2013, 3:67-75

Published Date: 22 April 2013

To write alone or not to write alone, that is the question

Vance DE

Nursing: Research and Reviews 2013, 3:43-46

Published Date: 13 March 2013

Potential factors that may promote successful cognitive aging

Vance DE

Nursing: Research and Reviews 2012, 2:27-32

Published Date: 20 June 2012

Successful aging and the epidemiology of HIV

Vance DE, McGuinness T, Musgrove K, Orel N, Fazeli PL

Clinical Interventions in Aging 2011, 6:181-192

Published Date: 28 June 2011

Religion, spirituality, and older adults with HIV: critical personal and social resources for an aging epidemic

Vance D, Brennan M, Enah C, Smith G, Kaur J

Clinical Interventions in Aging 2011, 6:101-109

Published Date: 9 May 2011

Readers of this article also read:

Dendrimer-coupled sonophoresis-mediated transdermal drug-delivery system for diclofenac

Huang B, Dong WJ, Yang GY, Wang W, Ji CH, Zhou FN

Drug Design, Development and Therapy 2015, 9:3867-3876

Published Date: 23 July 2015

Issues in assessing products for the treatment of hemophilia – the intersection between efficacy, economics, and ethics

Farrugia A, Noone D, Schlenkrich U, Schlenkrich S, O’Mahony B, Cassar J

Journal of Blood Medicine 2015, 6:185-195

Published Date: 15 June 2015

Profile of efraloctocog alfa and its potential in the treatment of hemophilia A

George LA, Camire RM

Journal of Blood Medicine 2015, 6:131-141

Published Date: 24 April 2015

Using portable negative pressure wound therapy devices in the home care setting

Burke JR, Morley R, Khanbhai M

Smart Homecare Technology and TeleHealth 2014, 2:129-135

Published Date: 9 December 2014

Second case report of successful electroconvulsive therapy for a patient with schizophrenia and severe hemophilia A

Saito N, Shioda K, Nisijima K, Kobayashi T, Kato S

Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment 2014, 10:865-867

Published Date: 16 May 2014

Managing hemophilia: the role of mobile technology

Khair K, Holland M

Smart Homecare Technology and TeleHealth 2014, 2:39-44

Published Date: 6 May 2014

Wound care in the geriatric client

Steve Gist, Iris Tio-Matos, Sharon Falzgraf, Shirley Cameron, Michael Beebe

Clinical Interventions in Aging 2009, 4:269-287

Published Date: 8 June 2009