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Non-adherence to topical treatments for actinic keratosis

Authors Shergill B, Zokaie S, Carr A, Cimino A

Received 24 April 2013

Accepted for publication 6 June 2013

Published 17 December 2013 Volume 2014:8 Pages 35—41

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/PPA.S47126

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 3

Bav Shergill,1 Simon Zokaie,2 Alison J Carr3

1Department of Dermatology, Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals, Elm Grove, Brighton, UK; 2Leo Pharma, Princes Risborough, 3Hamell, London, UK

Background: There is limited information on the patterns of use, adherence rates, and factors that impact adherence with topical treatments for actinic keratosis (AK).
Objectives: To establish patterns of use and adherence with topical treatments for AK and to identify treatment-related factors that impact on adherence.
Methods: A community-based, cross-sectional study was performed using a standardized questionnaire completed online or via telephone interview. Patients were stratified according to the presence of AK lesions on the scalp and/or other extremities; and presence of scarring resulting from treatment.
Results: This study included 305 patients with AK who were currently using a patient-applied topical therapy for AK or had used one within the previous 12 months. In total, 88% (n = 268/305) of patients were either non-adherent, non-persistent or both non-adherent and non-persistent to topical therapy. Duration of treatment was associated with increasing rates of non-adherence (adjusted odds ratio [OR]; for treatment durations greater than 4 weeks, 2.2, P < 0.01): 52% of patients were non-adherent with 3–4 week treatment duration; 69% of patients with 4–8 week treatment duration; and 71% of patients with 6–12 week treatment duration. There were similar increases in non-persistence with increasing treatment duration (adjusted OR; for treatment durations greater than 4 weeks, 2.1, P < 0.05).
Conclusion: This study found high rates of non-adherence and non-persistence in patients with AK. Duration of treatment was a significant factor contributing to non-adherence and non-persistence to topical treatments. Patient-applied topical therapies that require less frequent application and have shorter treatment duration may be associated with improved adherence rates.

Keywords: patient compliance, chronic skin disease, treatment duration, patient behavior

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