Back to Journals » Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management » Volume 10

Experimental study of tissue-engineered cartilage allograft with RNAi chondrocytes in vivo

Authors Wang ZH, Li XL, He XJ, Zhang XH, Yang ZQ, Xu M, Wu BJ, Tu JB, Luo HN, Yan J

Received 13 July 2013

Accepted for publication 5 March 2014

Published 8 May 2014 Volume 2014:10 Pages 335—340

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/TCRM.S51518

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 4

Zhenghui Wang,1 Xiaoli Li,2 Xi-Jing He,3 Xianghong Zhang,1 Zhuangqun Yang,4 Min Xu,1 Baojun Wu,1 Junbo Tu,5 Huanan Luo,1 Jing Yan1

1
Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, 2Department of Dermatology, 3Department of Orthopedics, The Second Hospital, Xi’an Jiaotong University, 4Department of Plastic and Burns Surgery, The First Hospital, Xi’an Jiaotong University, 5Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Plastic Surgery, The Stomatological Hospital, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, People’s Republic of China

Purpose: To determine the effects of RNA interference (RNAi) on chondrocyte proliferation, function, and immunological rejection after allogenic tissue-engineered cartilage transplantation within bone matrix gelatin scaffolds.
Methods: Seven million rat normal and RNAi chondrocytes were harvested and separately composited with fibrin glue to make the cell suspension, and then transplanted subcutaneously into the back of Sprague Dawley rats after being cultured for 10 days in vitro. Untransplanted animals served as the control group. The allograft and immunological response were examined at 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12 months postoperatively with hematoxylin and eosin histochemical staining, immunohistochemical staining (aggrecan, type II collagen, class I and II major histocompatibility complex), and flow cytometry for peripheral blood cluster of differentiation 4+ (CD4+) and CD8+ T-cells.
Results: There was no infection or death in the rats except one, which died in the first week. Compared to the control group, the RNAi group had fewer eukomonocytes infiltrated, which were only distributed around the graft. The ratio of CD4+/CD8+ T-cells in the RNAi group was significantly lower than the normal one (P<0.05). There were many more positively stained chondrocytes and positively stained areas around the cells in the RNAi group, which were not found in the control group.
Conclusion: The aggrecanase-1 and aggrecanase-2 RNAi for chondrocytes decreased the immunological rejection effect.

Keywords: chondrocytes, tissue-engineered cartilage, aggrecan, aggrecanase, allograft, immunological response, RNA interference

Creative Commons License This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution - Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License. By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. For permission for commercial use of this work, please see paragraphs 4.2 and 5 of our Terms.

Download Article [PDF]  View Full Text [HTML][Machine readable]

 

Readers of this article also read:

Green synthesis of water-soluble nontoxic polymeric nanocomposites containing silver nanoparticles

Prozorova GF, Pozdnyakov AS, Kuznetsova NP, Korzhova SA, Emel’yanov AI, Ermakova TG, Fadeeva TV, Sosedova LM

International Journal of Nanomedicine 2014, 9:1883-1889

Published Date: 16 April 2014

Methacrylic-based nanogels for the pH-sensitive delivery of 5-Fluorouracil in the colon

Ashwanikumar N, Kumar NA, Nair SA, Kumar GS

International Journal of Nanomedicine 2012, 7:5769-5779

Published Date: 15 November 2012

A novel preparation method for silicone oil nanoemulsions and its application for coating hair with silicone

Hu Z, Liao M, Chen Y, Cai Y, Meng L, Liu Y, Lv N, Liu Z, Yuan W

International Journal of Nanomedicine 2012, 7:5719-5724

Published Date: 12 November 2012

Cross-linked acrylic hydrogel for the controlled delivery of hydrophobic drugs in cancer therapy

Deepa G, Thulasidasan AK, Anto RJ, Pillai JJ, Kumar GS

International Journal of Nanomedicine 2012, 7:4077-4088

Published Date: 27 July 2012

Corrigendum: Softec HD hydrophilic acrylic intraocular lens: biocompatibility and precision

Espandar L, Sikder S, Moshirfar M

Clinical Ophthalmology 2011, 5:159-160

Published Date: 6 February 2011

Crystallization after intravitreal ganciclovir injection

Pitipol Choopong, Nattaporn Tesavibul, Nattawut Rodanant

Clinical Ophthalmology 2010, 4:709-711

Published Date: 14 July 2010