Back to Journals » Clinical Interventions in Aging » Volume 10

Lower creatinine as a marker of malnutrition and lower muscle mass in hemodialysis patients

Authors Yildiz A, Tufan F

Received 18 August 2015

Accepted for publication 21 August 2015

Published 3 October 2015 Volume 2015:10 Pages 1593—1594

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/CIA.S94731

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Editor who approved publication: Dr Richard Walker

Download Article [PDF] 

Abdulmecit Yildiz,1 Fatih Tufan2

1Department of Nephrology, Uludag University School of Medicine, Bursa, 2Department of Geriatrics, Istanbul Faculty of Medicine, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey

We read the recently published and well-designed study of Lee et al that suggests that bioimpedance analysis (BIA) gives relevant information about hydration status and malnutrition in hemodialysis patients. The authors recommend that utilization of BIA routinely in hemodialysis patients would be rational. We would like to make a few comments about their study.

View original paper by Lee et al.

Dear editor

We read the recently published and well-designed study of Lee et al1 that suggests that bioimpedance analysis (BIA) gives relevant information about hydration status and malnutrition in hemodialysis patients. The authors recommend that utilization of BIA routinely in hemodialysis patients would be rational. We would like to make a few comments about their study.

In their study, elderly subjects had significantly lower creatinine levels. Recent studies indicate that lower creatinine levels in patients undergoing hemodialysis are associated with lower muscle mass, malnutrition, and mortality.2 We have also observed lower creatinine levels and higher urea/creatinine ratios in elderly hemodialysis patients compared with younger ones and in those with poorer nutritional status compared with those with normal nutritional status.3 Thus, we recommend that the authors report on the association between creatinine, handgrip strength, BIA measurements, and malnutrition inflammation score in their study that may provide clinically relevant and practical information.

Disclosure

The authors report no conflicts of interest in this communication.


References

1.

Lee JE, Jo IY, Lee SM, et al. Comparison of hydration and nutritional status between young and elderly hemodialysis patients through bioimpedance analysis. Clinical Interventions in Aging. 2015;10:1327–1334.

2.

Park J, Mehrotra R, Rhee CM, et al. Serum creatinine level, a surrogate of muscle mass, predicts mortality in peritoneal dialysis patients. Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2013;28(8):2146–2155.

3.

Tufan F, Yildiz A, Dogan I, Yildiz D, Sevinir S. Urea to creatinine ratio: a forgotten marker of poor nutritional state in patients undergoing hemodialysis treatment. Aging Male. 2015;18(1):49–53.

Authors’ reply

Jung Eun Lee,1,2 In Young Jo,3 Song Mi Lee,3 Woo Jeong Kim,3 Hoon Young Choi,2,4 Sung Kyu Ha,4 Hyung Jong Kim,5 Hyeong Cheon Park2,4

1Department of Internal Medicine, Yongin Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 2Severance Institute for Vascular and Metabolic Research, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 3Department of Nutrition Services, Gangnam Severance Hospital, 4Department of Internal Medicine, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, 5Department of Internal Medicine, CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University, Seongnam, Korea

Correspondence: Hyeong Cheon Park, Department of Internal Medicine, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 211 Eonju-ro, Gangnam-gu, Seoul, 135-720, Korea, Tel +82 2 2019 3310, Fax +82 2 3463 3882, Email [email protected]

Hyung Jong Kim, Department of Internal Medicine, Bundang CHA Medical Center, CHA University, 59 Yatap-ro, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do, 463-712, Korea, Tel +82 31 780 5895, Fax +82 31 780 5981, Email [email protected]

Dear editor

We would like to thank Drs Yildiz and Tufan for their thoughtful comments on our recent study.1 Malnutrition is common in elderly hemodialysis (HD) patients and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality.2 Therefore, proper assessment of nutritional status and its management is essential for elderly HD patients. A panel of tests that assess body composition as well as body protein stores are recommended. The serum creatinine (Cr) level before dialysis is a strong predictor of low muscle mass and poor outcome.3 Our study also demonstrated that elderly HD patients have lower serum Cr levels similar to the study by Tufan et al.4 Univariate analysis showed serum Cr level was significantly associated with malnutrition-inflammation score (β=−0.289, P=0.008). However, on multivariate analysis, serum Cr level lost its significance (β=−0.015, P=0.899). The serum Cr level has been used as a biochemical nutritional marker along with serum albumin or prealbumin. However, the observed serum Cr is to some extent dependent on the intake of animal proteins and study population differences may also contribute to discrepancies. Measuring serum Cr level is cheap compared to other biochemical nutritional markers and is routinely measured in HD patients. However, serum Cr measurements may not give the full picture of nutritional status and lack significance compared to bioimpedance analysis measurement especially in elderly HD patients.

Disclosure

The authors report no conflicts of interest in this communication.


References

1.

Lee JE, Jo IY, Lee SM, et al. Comparison of hydration and nutritional status between young and elderly hemodialysis patients through bioimpedance analysis. Clinical Interventions in Aging. 2015;10:1327–1334.

2.

Wolfson M. Nutrition in elderly dialysis patients. Semin Dial. 2002;15(2):113–115.

3.

Heimbürger O, Qureshi AR, Blaner WS, Berglund L, Stenvinkel P. Hand-grip muscle strength, lean body mass, and plasma proteins as markers of nutritional status in patients with chronic renal failure close to start of dialysis therapy. Am J Kidney Dis. 2000;36(6):1213–1225.

4.

Tufan F, Yildiz A, Dogan I, Yildiz D, Sevinir S. Urea to creatinine ratio: a forgotten marker of poor nutritional state in patients undergoing hemodialysis treatment. Aging Male. 2015;18(1):49–53.

Creative Commons License This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution - Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License. By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. For permission for commercial use of this work, please see paragraphs 4.2 and 5 of our Terms.

Download Article [PDF]