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Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices of Antimicrobial Uses and Resistance Among Public University Students in Bangladesh

Authors Marzan M, Islam DZ, Lugova H, Krishnapillai A, Haque M, Islam S

Received 2 November 2020

Accepted for publication 13 January 2021

Published 11 February 2021 Volume 2021:14 Pages 519—533

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/IDR.S289964

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single anonymous peer review

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Professor Suresh Antony


Mahfuza Marzan,1 Dewan Zubaer Islam,1 Halyna Lugova,2 Ambigga Krishnapillai,3 Mainul Haque,4 Salequl Islam1

1Department of Microbiology, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka, 1342, Bangladesh; 2The Unit of Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Defence Health, National Defence University of Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, 57000, Malaysia; 3The Unit of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Defence Health, National Defence University of Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, 57000, Malaysia; 4The Unit of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine and Defence Health, Universiti Pertahanan Nasional Malaysia (National Defence University of Malaysia), Kuala Lumpur, 57000, Malaysia

Correspondence: Salequl Islam
Department of Microbiology, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka, 1342, Bangladesh
Tel +880-1715029136
Fax +880-2-7791052
Email salequl@juniv.edu
Mainul Haque
Faculty of Medicine and Defence Health, Universiti Pertahanan Nasional Malaysia (National Defence University of Malaysia), Kem Perdana Sungai Besi, 57000, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
, +60109265543
Email runurono@gmail.com

Background: Antibiotics are lifesaving drugs, and inappropriate uses lead to the resistance that renders them ineffective. This study aims to understand knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) concerning antibiotic use and resistance among university students in Bangladesh.
Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed from January to April 2020 among students at Jahangirnagar University (JU), Bangladesh. Purposive sampling was conducted through an in-person interview using a structured questionnaire. Students from the faculties of biological sciences and non-biology background were included. The univariate ordinal regression technique was used to analyze the relationship between predictors and good knowledge about the antibiotics. A two-tailed p-value was calculated to determine statistical association.
Results: Out of 205 study participants, 92 and 113 responders were from biological science faculty and non-biology disciplines, respectively. Less than half of the students (42.4%) showed a good knowledge level (scores higher than 80%). Biology-background students possess better knowledge than non-biology students [odds ratio (OR) = 4.44, 95% confidence level (CL) (2.56, 7.70), p < 0.001]. A better attitude was noticed among all students. The self-medication rate was quite low, and more than 90% of students were found to consume antibiotics according to the physician’s prescription. Lack of treatment adherence was recorded, and students admitted to stop-taking antibiotics when symptoms disappeared (48.67% biology and 36.26% non-biology). Multivariate regression analysis was unable to detect any significant association between self-medication and gender, student category or the level of knowledge about antibiotics.
Conclusion: Students of biological science background possessed better knowledge indicating the importance of appropriate curriculum imparted in knowledge buildup. Introducing a short course about the risk and development of antibiotic resistance will grow the students’ awareness to avoid the resistance phenomenon.

Keywords: knowledge, anti-bacterial agents, antibiotic, drug resistance, state-owned, university students, Bangladesh

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