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Knowledge, attitude, and practice regarding voluntary blood donation among adult residents of Harar town, Eastern Ethiopia: a community-based study

Authors Urgesa K, Hassen N, Seyoum A

Received 4 September 2016

Accepted for publication 14 December 2016

Published 15 February 2017 Volume 2017:8 Pages 13—20

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/JBM.S121460

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Lucy Goodman

Peer reviewer comments 3

Editor who approved publication: Dr Martin Bluth

Kedir Urgesa,1 Nejat Hassen,2 Ayichew Seyoum1

1Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, 2Department of Public Health, Haramaya University, Harar, Ethiopia


Background: The availability of safe blood and blood products is a critical factor in improving health care. In Ethiopia, lack of voluntary blood donors is a major challenge. This could be due to low community knowledge, unfavorable attitude, and poor donation practice regarding voluntary blood donation. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess community knowledge, attitude, and practice regarding voluntary blood donation among adults in Harar town, Ethiopia.
Materials and methods: A community-based cross-sectional study was conducted from July 1 to July 31, 2015. A total of 845 adults were randomly selected and interviewed using a pretested, structured questionnaire. Six trained data collectors conducted a face-to-face interview. Data were entered into EpiData Version 3 and analyzed using STATA Version 11.
Results: Comprehensive knowledge of the study participants toward voluntary blood donation was 43.5%. Multivariable logistic regression demonstrated that male sex (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.69, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.19–2.39), age (31–45 years; AOR = 0.50, 95% CI: 0.34–0.74) and >45 years (AOR = 0.60, 95% CI: 0.38–0.95), and higher education (AOR = 15.34, 95% CI: 5.01–46.91) were significantly associated with comprehensive knowledge about voluntary blood donation. A total of 278 (32.9%) study participants had positive attitude toward voluntary blood donation. College graduates (AOR = 13.05, 95% CI: 4.12–41.29) were significantly associated with positive attitude toward voluntary blood donation. Only 191 (22.6%) subjects had ever donated blood. However, the proportion of study participants who donated blood voluntarily with good knowledge about voluntary blood donation was significantly lower than the study participants who donated blood voluntarily with low knowledge (X2 = 6.1746, P = 0.013).
Conclusion: This study showed an inauspicious attitude toward blood donation and poor blood donation practices. Subjects with good comprehensive knowledge about voluntary blood donation were less likely to donate blood voluntarily compared to those with lower comprehensive knowledge about voluntary blood donation.

Keywords: community, voluntary blood donation, knowledge, attitude, practice

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