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Insufficient Knowledge and Vaccination Practice of Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients in the People’s Republic of China

Authors Feng S, Lin S, Ma L, Xu S, Chen Y

Received 30 May 2020

Accepted for publication 30 July 2020

Published 24 August 2020 Volume 2020:14 Pages 1513—1521

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/PPA.S265346

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single anonymous peer review

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Dr Naifeng Liu


Shuyi Feng,1 Saizheng Lin,2 Lingling Ma,3 Song Xu,4 Yan Chen5

1The Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Gastroenterology, Ningbo Zhenhai People’s Hospital, Ningbo, Zhejiang Province, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Gastroenterology, Dongying People’s Hospital, Dongying, Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China; 4PhD Center for Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Department of Gastroenterology, The Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, People’s Republic of China; 5Center for Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Department of Gastroenterology, The Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, People’s Republic of China

Correspondence: Yan Chen
Center for Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Department of Gastroenterology, The Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province 310009, People’s Republic of China
Email chenyan72_72@zju.edu.cn

Background: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients are at risk for HBV and varicella, which makes vaccination an important role.
Aim: To assess knowledge and vaccination rate of Chinese IBD patients and find the influencing factors.
Methods: An online anonymous questionnaire was distributed to IBD patients through www.wjx.cn in the People’s Republic of China during October 2019 to February 2020. The Kappa value and multivariate analysis were used to analyze the data using SPSS 25.0.
Results: Among 900 participants, 746 (82.9%) hadreceived immunosuppressive treatment. Only 25 (2.78%) patients thought that they had sufficient information on vaccination, and 311 (34.6%) patients remembered being reminded about vaccination by their doctors before. The self-reported vaccination rate for hepatitis B was 125/666 (18.8%), and for varicella 44/671 (6.6%). Information from doctors was positively associated with vaccination status of hepatitis B (odds ratio [OR]=4.61, 95% confidence interval [Cl: 2.73– 7.76], p< 0.001) and varicella (OR=4.93, 95%Cl :2.02– 12.05, p< 0.001). The patients whose duration of IBD diagnosis was more than 2 years (OR=0.37, 95% Cl: 0.16– 0.87, p=0.022) and those older than 38 years (OR=0.37, 95% Cl: 0.14– 1.00, p=0.0497) were negatively related with the status of varicella vaccination.
Conclusion: Vaccination-related knowledge level in IBD patients appeared to be low and the rate of vaccination of both hepatitis and varicella was way below the recommended level. Proper education of both IBD patients and gastroenterologists in the People’s Republic of China is needed.

Keywords: inflammatory bowel disease, vaccination, hepatitis B, varicella

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