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Hypnosis intervention for the management of pain perception during cataract surgery

Authors Chen X, Yuan R, Chen X, Sun M, Lin S, Ye J, Chen C

Received 25 May 2018

Accepted for publication 13 July 2018

Published 20 September 2018 Volume 2018:11 Pages 1921—1926

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/JPR.S174490

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Colin Mak

Peer reviewer comments 3

Editor who approved publication: Dr Michael Ueberall


Xiaofan Chen,1,* Rongdi Yuan,1,* Xiao Chen,2 Min Sun,2 Sen Lin,2 Jian Ye,2 Chunlin Chen2

1Department of Ophthalmology, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, 400042, China; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Institute of Surgery Research, Daping Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, 400042, China

*These authors contributed equally to this work

Objective: To investigate the effectiveness of hypnosis in pain management during cataract surgery.
Methods: Male or female patients with bilateral age-related cataract who wished to have both eyes subjected to phacoemulsification surgery were preliminarily admitted. Immediately after the first-eye surgery, each patient was evaluated for pain using the visual analog scale (VAS), and patients with a VAS score >1 were enrolled. By using block randomization, the enrolled patients were allocated to either the treatment group, which received a hypnosis intervention before the scheduled second-eye surgery, or the control group, which did not undergo hypnosis. The levels of anxiety, pain, and cooperation were evaluated independently by the patients and the surgeon.
Results: During the intraoperative pain assessment, 5%, 34%, 38%, and 23% of patients in the control group reported experiencing no pain, mild pain, moderate pain, and severe pain, respectively. In contrast, in the hypnosis group, 18%, 56%, 15%, and 11% of patients reported experiencing no pain, mild pain, moderate pain, and severe pain, respectively, which showed significant differences between the groups (P<0.005). The evaluation of anxiety level showed that the mean score in the control group and hypnosis group was 11.77±0.32 and 6.64±0.21, respectively, revealing a highly significant difference between the two groups (P<0.005). The assessment of patient cooperation showed that only 5% and 18% of patients in the control group and 18% and 36% of patients in the hypnosis group showed excellent and good cooperation, respectively, while 47% of patients in the control group and only 24% of patients in the hypnosis group exhibited poor cooperation, revealing significant differences between the groups (P<0.005).
Conclusion: Hypnosis may be considered as an auxiliary measure in cataract surgery, especially for patients who experienced obvious pain during the first-eye surgery.

Keywords: pain, patient satisfaction, cataract surgery, hypnosis

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