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Exercise-induced asthma: critical analysis of the protective role of montelukast

Authors Carver T

Published 22 October 2009 Volume 2009:2 Pages 93—103

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/JAA.S7321

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 2


Terrence W Carver Jr

The Children’s Mercy Hospital and Clinics, Kansas City, MO, USA

Abstract: Exercise-induced asthma/exercise-induced bronchospasm (EIA/EIB) is a prevalent and clinically important disease affecting young children through older adulthood. These terms are often used interchangeably and the differences are not clearly defined in the literature. The pathogenesis of EIA/EIB may be different in those with persistent asthma compared to those with exercise-induced symptoms only. The natural history of EIA is unclear and may be different for elite athletes. Leukotriene biology has helped the understanding of EIB. The type and intensity of exercise are important factors for EIB. Exercise participation is necessary for proper development and control of EIA is recommended. Symptoms of EIB should be confirmed by proper testing. Biologic markers may also be helpful in diagnosis. Not all exercise symptoms are from EIB. Many medication and nonpharmacologic treatments are available. Asthma education is an important component of managing EIA. Many medications have been tested and the comparisons are complicated. Montelukast is a US Food and Drug Administration-approved asthma and EIB controller and has a number of potential advantages to other asthma medications including short onset of action, ease of use, and lack of tolerance. Not all patients improve with montelukast and rescue medication should be available.

Keywords: exercise, asthma, montelukast, Singulair, bronchospasm, leukotrienes

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