Back to Journals » Clinical and Experimental Gastroenterology » Volume 12

Estradiol accelerates liver regeneration through estrogen receptor α

Authors Tsugawa Y, Natori M, Handa H, Imai T

Received 3 May 2019

Accepted for publication 27 June 2019

Published 22 July 2019 Volume 2019:12 Pages 331—336

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/CEG.S214196

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Colin Mak

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Prof. Dr. Everson L.A. Artifon


Yoji Tsugawa,1 Michiya Natori,2 Hiroshi Handa,3 Takeshi Imai1

1Department of Aging Intervention, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Obu, Aichi 474-8511, Japan; 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Tokyo Medical University, Shinjuku, Tokyo 160-8402, Japan; 3Department of Nanoparticle Translational Research, Tokyo Medical University, Shinjuku, Tokyo 160-8402, Japan

Background: We previously demonstrated that liver resection triggers estradiol production, which, in turn, induces the proliferation of hepatocytes to promote liver regeneration in mice. In this study, we demonstrated estradiol-induced estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) expression.
Methods: To further explore the role of ERα in estradiol-mediated liver regeneration, in the present study, we confirmed impaired liver regeneration ability in ERα knockout mice.
Results: Further analysis during liver regeneration revealed a role for ERα in hepatic steatosis, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin 6 expression, and nuclear factor-κB and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 DNA-binding activities.
Conclusion: Moreover, estradiol administration accelerated liver regeneration through ERα, indicating the feasibility of the estrogen-ERα axis as a target for accelerating the rate of liver regeneration.

Keywords: estrogens, estrogen receptor α; ERα, partial hepatectomy, liver regeneration

Creative Commons License This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution - Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License. By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. For permission for commercial use of this work, please see paragraphs 4.2 and 5 of our Terms.

Download Article [PDF]  View Full Text [HTML][Machine readable]