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Effect of bilberry extract on slowing high-myopia progression in children: 2-year follow-up study

Authors Omar IA

Received 21 September 2018

Accepted for publication 6 November 2018

Published 12 December 2018 Volume 2018:12 Pages 2575—2579

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S187949

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Cristina Weinberg

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Dr Scott Fraser


Ismail Ahmed Nagib Omar

Ophthalmology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Minia University, El-Minya, Egypt

Aim: To evaluate the effect of oral Difrarel on progression of high myopia in children and to study myopia course after its discontinuation.
Methods: A total of 64 highly myopic children were enrolled in this study. Patients were divided into two equal groups: group 1 was administered Difrarel for 1 year and stopped its intake for another year, and group 2 (control) did not take Difrarel. Refraction and axial length of the right eye of every subject were measured every 6 months in both groups.
Results: Each group had 32 eyes of 32 patients. The mean age was 9.34±2.27 years in group 1 and 9.33±2.2 years in group 2. Mean refraction and axial length at the start of the study were -10.78±2.6 D and 23.7±1.2 mm, respectively, in group 1, and -10.5±2.55 D and 23.9±1.4 mm in group 2. Refraction and axial length measurements every 6 months revealed statistically significant lower numbers in group 1 than group 2 after 1 year. After discontinuation of the drug, the difference between both groups remained significant.
Conclusion: Oral Difrarel slowed axial elongation and stopped myopia progression in children with high myopia. The drug effect was consistent after its discontinuation for 1 year.

Keywords: high myopia in children, Difrarel, axial myopia, progressive myopia

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