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Current perspectives in percutaneous atrial septal defect closure devices

Authors Bissessor N

Received 18 January 2015

Accepted for publication 19 March 2015

Published 15 July 2015 Volume 2015:8 Pages 297—303

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/MDER.S49368

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Dr Scott Fraser

Video abstract presented by N Bissessor

Views: 232

N Bissessor1–4

1Department of Cardiology, The Epworth Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; 2Division of Interventional Cardiology, The Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; 3Department of Clinical Science, Charles Sturt University Albury Campus, NSW, Australia; 4Heart Foundation, Griffith University, QLD, Australia

Abstract: In the last decade, percutaneous atrial septal defect (ASD) closure has become the treatment of choice in most clinical presentations of ASD. Percutaneous ASD closure has established procedural safety through operator experience and improved device structure and deliverability. There have also been advances in diagnostic capabilities. Devices have evolved from large bulky meshes to repositionable, minimal residual mesh content that easily endothelializes and conforms well to surrounding structures. Biodegradable technology has been introduced and will be closely watched as a future option. The evolution of ASD closure device usage in the last four decades incorporates development that minimizes a wide range of serious side effects that have been reported over the years. Complications reported in the literature include thrombus formation, air embolization, device embolization, erosions, residual shunts, and nickel hypersensitivity. Modern devices have intermediate to long term data with outcomes that have been favorable. Devices are available in multiple sizes with improved delivery mechanisms to recapture, reposition, and safely close simple and complex ASDs amenable to percutaneous closure. In this review, commonly used devices and deployment procedures are discussed together with a look at devices that show promise for the future.

Keywords: ASD, congenital, Amplatzer, Gore Helex, Biostar, Figulla

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