Back to Journals » Drug Design, Development and Therapy » Volume 12

Current development of biodegradable polymeric materials for biomedical applications

Authors Song R, Murphy M, Li C, Ting K, Soo C, Zheng Z

Received 13 February 2018

Accepted for publication 9 July 2018

Published 24 September 2018 Volume 2018:12 Pages 3117—3145

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/DDDT.S165440

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Colin Mak

Peer reviewer comments 5

Editor who approved publication: Dr Anastasios Lymperopoulos


Richard Song,1 Maxwell Murphy,1 Chenshuang Li,1 Kang Ting,1–3 Chia Soo,2 Zhong Zheng1

1Division of Growth and Development, Section of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2UCLA Department of Surgery and Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and The Orthopaedic Hospital Research Center, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 3UCLA Department of Bioengineering, School of Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA

Abstract: In the last half-century, the development of biodegradable polymeric materials for biomedical applications has advanced significantly. Biodegradable polymeric materials are favored in the development of therapeutic devices, including temporary implants and three-dimensional scaffolds for tissue engineering. Further advancements have occurred in the utilization of biodegradable polymeric materials for pharmacological applications such as delivery vehicles for controlled/sustained drug release. These applications require particular physicochemical, biological, and degradation properties of the materials to deliver effective therapy. As a result, a wide range of natural or synthetic polymers able to undergo hydrolytic or enzymatic degradation is being studied for biomedical applications. This review outlines the current development of biodegradable natural and synthetic polymeric materials for various biomedical applications, including tissue engineering, temporary implants, wound healing, and drug delivery.

Keywords: tissue engineering, drug delivery, wound healing, natural biomaterials, synthetic biomaterials

Creative Commons License This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution - Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License. By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. For permission for commercial use of this work, please see paragraphs 4.2 and 5 of our Terms.

Download Article [PDF]  View Full Text [HTML][Machine readable]