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Correlation between ocular perfusion pressure and ocular pulse amplitude in glaucoma, ocular hypertension, and normal eyes

Authors Figueiredo BP, Cronemberger S, Kanadani FN

Received 26 February 2013

Accepted for publication 13 March 2013

Published 9 August 2013 Volume 2013:7 Pages 1615—1621

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S44523

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 4

Bruno P Figueiredo,1,2 Sebastião Cronemberger,1 Fabio N Kanadani3,4

1Departments of Ophthalmology, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, 2Departments of Ophthalmology, Glaucoma and Cataract Service, Santa Casa of Belo Horizonte, 3Department of Ophthalmology, São José University Hospital, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, 4Department of Ophthalmology, Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil

Background: The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between ocular perfusion pressure and ocular pulse amplitude in glaucoma, ocular hypertension, and normal eyes.
Methods: Ninety eyes from 90 patients were included. Thirty patients had been recently diagnosed with glaucoma and had no previous history of treatment for ocular hypotension, 30 had elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) without evidence of glaucoma, and 30 had normal IOP (<21 mmHg) with no detectable glaucomatous damage. Goldmann applanation tonometry (GAT), dynamic contour tonometry (DCT), blood pressure measurement, pachymetry, Humphrey visual field, and routine ophthalmic examination was performed in each patient. Ocular perfusion pressure was calculated as the difference between mean arterial pressure and IOP. The ocular pulse amplitude was given by DCT. The Pearson correlation coefficient was used to compare the glaucomatous and ocular hypertensive groups, and comparisons with the normal IOP group were done using the Spearman's rank correlation coefficient.
Results: Mean IOP by DCT was 22.7 ± 4.3 mmHg in the glaucoma group, 22.3 ± 2.8 mmHg in the ocular hypertension group, and 14.3 ± 1.6 mmHg in the control group. Mean IOP by GAT was 19.0 ± 5.1 mmHg for glaucoma, 22.4 ± 2.1 mmHg for ocular hypertension, and 12.9 ± 2.2 mmHg for controls. Mean ocular pulse amplitude was 3.4 ± 1.2 mmHg in the glaucoma group, 3.5 ± 1.2 mmHg in the ocular hypertension group, and 2.6 ± 0.9 mmHg in the control group. Mean ocular perfusion pressure was 46.3 ± 7.9 mmHg in the glaucoma group, 46.3 ± 7.9 mmHg in the ocular hypertension group, and 50.2 ± 7.0 mmHg in controls. No significant correlation between ocular perfusion pressure and ocular pulse amplitude was found in any of the groups (P = 0.865 and r = -0.032, P = 0.403 and r = -0.156, P = 0.082 and ρ = -0.307 for glaucoma, ocular hypertension, and normal eyes, respectively).
Conclusion: There is no significant correlation between ocular perfusion pressure and ocular pulse amplitude values in glaucoma, ocular hypertension, or normal eyes. IOP values measured by GAT correlate with those measured by DCT.

Keywords: glaucoma, ocular pulse amplitude, ocular perfusion pressure, dynamic contour tonometry, vascular factors

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