Back to Browse Journals » Open Access Journal of Contraception » Volume 1

Contraceptive practices in Nigeria: Literature review and recommendation for future policy decisions

Authors Emmanuel Monjok, Andrea Smesny, John E Ekabua, et al

Published 5 May 2010 Volume 2010:1 Pages 9—22


Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 2

Emmanuel Monjok1, Andrea Smesny1, John E Ekabua2, E James Essien1

1Institute of Community Health, University of Houston, Texas, USA; 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Calabar, Nigeria

Abstract: The current prevalence rate for contraceptive use in Nigeria is approximately 11%–13%. This rate is very low in spite of the high rate of sexual activity and widespread awareness of the various contraceptive methods among Nigerian adolescence and youths. As a result there are many unintended pregnancies and illegal abortions contributing to a high maternal mortality ratio, which seems to indicate a large unmet need for contraceptive use. There is ample research evidence identifying the various factors that contribute to the low prevalence of modern contraceptive use in Nigeria, with the most common factor being the myth about the side effects of modern contraceptives. However, what is lacking is a political will in Nigeria to provide family planning programs on a much larger scale, using community-oriented approaches and communication programs, to help change the myth about the side effects of modern contraceptives. This review highlights current methods and concepts in contraception, reasons for low contraceptive use and practice in Nigeria, and the need for Nigeria to generate a political priority and a will to make a change in maternal health indicators, with the ultimate goal of providing direction to guide changes in the Nigerian Population Policy as it affects contraceptive use and family planning.
Keywords: contraceptive practice, literature review, research, Nigeria

Download Article [PDF] 

Creative Commons License This work is published by Dove Medical Press Limited, and licensed under Creative Commons Attribution - Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License. The full terms of the License are available at Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. Permissions beyond the scope of the License are administered by Dove Medical Press Limited. Information on how to request permission may be found at:

Readers of this article also read:

Cognitive and psychological profiles in treatment compliance: a study in an elderly population with hemophilia

Riva S, Nobili A, Djade CD, Mancuso ME, Santagostino E, Pravettoni G

Clinical Interventions in Aging 2015, 10:1141-1146

Published Date: 9 July 2015

Acquired hemophilia A: emerging treatment options

Janbain M, Leissinger CA, Kruse-Jarres R

Journal of Blood Medicine 2015, 6:143-150

Published Date: 8 May 2015

Profile of efraloctocog alfa and its potential in the treatment of hemophilia A

George LA, Camire RM

Journal of Blood Medicine 2015, 6:131-141

Published Date: 24 April 2015

A new recombinant factor VIII: from genetics to clinical use

Santagostino E

Drug Design, Development and Therapy 2014, 8:2507-2515

Published Date: 12 December 2014

Patient preference and ease of use for different coagulation factor VIII reconstitution device scenarios: a cross-sectional survey in five European countries

Cimino E, Linari S, Malerba M, Halimeh S, Biondo F, Westfeld M

Patient Preference and Adherence 2014, 8:1713-1720

Published Date: 12 December 2014

Second case report of successful electroconvulsive therapy for a patient with schizophrenia and severe hemophilia A

Saito N, Shioda K, Nisijima K, Kobayashi T, Kato S

Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment 2014, 10:865-867

Published Date: 16 May 2014

Managing hemophilia: the role of mobile technology

Khair K, Holland M

Smart Homecare Technology and TeleHealth 2014, 2:39-44

Published Date: 6 May 2014