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Comparing Surf Lifeguards and Nurse Anesthetists’ Use of the i-gel Supraglottic Airway Device – An Observational Simulation Study

Authors Nørkjær L, Stærk M, Lauridsen KG, Gallacher TK, Løyche JB, Krogh K, Løfgren B

Received 18 November 2019

Accepted for publication 18 February 2020

Published 2 April 2020 Volume 2020:12 Pages 73—79

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/OAEM.S239040

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Dr Hans-Christoph Pape


Louise Nørkjær,1 Mathilde Stærk,1– 3 Kasper G Lauridsen,1– 3 Tabita K Gallacher,4 Jakob B Løyche,5 Kristian Krogh,1,4 Bo Løfgren1,3,6,7

1Research Center for Emergency Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; 2Clinical Research Unit, Randers Regional Hospital, Randers, Denmark; 3Department of Internal Medicine, Randers Regional Hospital, Randers, Denmark; 4Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; 5Department of Surgery and Intensive Care, Randers Regional Hospital, Randers, Denmark; 6Department of Cardiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; 7Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark

Correspondence: Bo Løfgren
Department of Internal Medicine, Randers Regional Hospital, Skovlyvej 15, Randers, NE DK-8930, Denmark
Email bl@clin.au.dk

Purpose: Using a supraglottic airway (SGA) may provide more effective ventilations compared with a mouth-to-pocket-mask for drowning victims. SGAs are widely used by nurse anesthetists but it is unknown whether surf lifeguards can use SGAs effectively. We aimed to compare the use of SGA by surf lifeguards and experienced nurse anesthetists.
Materials and Methods: Surf lifeguards inserted a SGA (i-gel O2, size 4) in a resuscitation manikin during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and nurse anesthetists inserted a SGA in a resuscitation manikin placed on a bed, and performed ventilations. Outcome measures: time to first ventilation, tidal volume, proportion of ventilations with visible manikin chest rise, and ventilations within the recommended tidal volume (0.5– 0.6 L).
Results: Overall, 30 surf lifeguards and 30 nurse anesthetists participated. Median (Q1–Q3) time to first ventilation was 20 s (15– 22) for surf lifeguards and 17 s (15– 21) for nurse anesthetists (p=0.31). Mean (SD) tidal volume was 0.55 L (0.21) for surf lifeguards and 0.31 L (0.10) for nurse anesthetists (p< 0.0001). Surf lifeguards and nurse anesthetists delivered 100% and 95% ventilations with visible manikin chest rise (p=0.004) and 19% and 5% ventilations within the recommended tidal volume, respectively (p< 0.0001).
Conclusion: In a simulated setting, there was no significant difference between surf lifeguards and experienced nurse anesthetists in time to first ventilation when using a SGA. Surf lifeguards delivered a higher tidal volume, and a higher proportion of ventilations within guideline recommendations, but generally ventilations caused visible manikin chest rise for both groups.

Keywords: cardiopulmonary resuscitation, drowning, ventilation, supraglottic airway, surf lifeguards, nurse anesthetists


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