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Coexistence of Anti-SOX1 and Anti-GABAB Receptor Antibodies with Autoimmune Encephalitis in Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Case Report

Authors Qin W, Wang X, Yang J, Hu W

Received 17 October 2019

Accepted for publication 20 January 2020

Published 7 February 2020 Volume 2020:15 Pages 171—175

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/CIA.S234660

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Dr Zhi-Ying Wu


Wei Qin, 1,* Xiao Wang, 1,* Jing Yang, 2 Wenli Hu 1

1Department of Neurology, Beijing Chaoyang Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100020, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Hyperbaric Oxygen, Beijing Chaoyang Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100020, People’s Republic of China

*These authors contributed equally to this work

Correspondence: Jing Yang
Department of Hyperbaric Oxygen, Beijing Chaoyang Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100020, People’s Republic of China
Tel +86 1085232005
Email jyangu@hotmail.com
Wenli Hu
Department of Neurology, Beijing Chaoyang Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100020, People’s Republic of China
Tel +86 1085231376
Email stroke2019@126.com

Abstract: Anti-γ-aminobutyric acid B receptor (anti-GABABR) encephalitis is a rare type of autoimmune encephalitis (AE). Although it responds well to immunomodulating therapy and has favorable prognosis, anti-GABABR AE has often been misdiagnosed as infectious encephalitis. Herein, we present a case of a 59-year-old female with anti-GABABR AE associated with small cell lung cancer (SCLC) that was once misdiagnosed as infectious encephalitis. Our findings increase the awareness that patients presenting with a clinical trial of cognitive impairment, seizures and SCLC may harbor AE. Our case also highlights the importance of anti-SOX1 antibody in the detection of SCLC.

Keywords: autoimmune encephalitis, anti-GABAB receptor, small cell lung cancer


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