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Clinical utility of clocortolone pivalate for the treatment of corticosteroid-responsive skin disorders: a systematic review

Authors Singh S, Mann

Received 13 April 2012

Accepted for publication 10 May 2012

Published 22 June 2012 Volume 2012:5 Pages 61—68

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/CCID.S23227

Review by Single anonymous peer review

Peer reviewer comments 2

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Sanjay Singh,* Baldeep Kaur Mann*

Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh, India

*Both authors contributed equally to the article

Abstract: Clocortolone pivalate 0.1% cream is a class IV mid-strength topical glucocorticoid. After topical application the glucocorticoid achieves higher concentration in inflamed skin compared with normal skin. Furthermore, pharmacologic studies have shown that there is little systemic absorption of clocortolone pivalate and hence no adrenal suppression. Systematic review was performed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the glucocorticoid. PubMed, the Cochrane Library, and individual websites of the top 20 dermatology journals were searched using a defined strategy. Following the selection criteria, eight clinical trials were selected, of which five were randomized controlled trials. The trials mainly included patients with atopic dermatitis and eczemas. Quality appraisal of randomized controlled trials was done using the Delphi list, which showed that the trials had weaknesses in several items. The results of the systematic review tend to show that clocortolone pivalate cream is generally effective with early onset of action and has a good safety profile in the treatment of these conditions. Further studies comparing this glucocorticoid with other glucocorticoids and treatments in steroid-responsive dermatoses are desirable.

Keywords: clocortolone pivalate, corticosteroid, glucocorticoid, systematic review

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