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Chronic Enteropathy In Canines: Prevalence, Impact And Management Strategies

Authors Dandrieux JRS, Mansfield CS

Received 22 March 2019

Accepted for publication 8 September 2019

Published 6 December 2019 Volume 2019:10 Pages 203—214

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/VMRR.S162774

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Professor Young Lyoo


Video abstract of 'Chronic enteropathy in canines' [ID 162774]

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Julien Rodolphe Samuel Dandrieux , Caroline Sarah Mansfield

Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Melbourne Veterinary School, Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences, University of Melbourne, Werribee, Victoria, Australia

Correspondence: Julien Rodolphe Samuel Dandrieux
Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Melbourne Veterinary School, Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences, University of Melbourne, Werribee, Victoria, Australia
Email julien.dandrieux@unimelb.edu.au

Abstract: In this article, the studies about the prevalence of chronic enteropathy are reviewed as well as the information regarding short- and long-term prognosis for dogs treated with the three most common therapies; these include dietary modification, antibiotics, and immunosuppressants. Although the data available are limited, most studies support a good to excellent long-term response in dogs that have a successful food trial, whereas the response is poor with antibiotics or on-going treatment is required to retain remission. There is a risk of antimicrobial resistance developing with inappropriate use of antimicrobials such as in these situations. The published information highlights the need for alternative strategies to antibiotic treatment to manipulate the GI microbiome, and in the final part of this article studies on the use of probiotic for the treatment of chronic enteropathy are reviewed.

Keywords: chronic enteropathy, inflammatory bowel disease, dog, treatment, probiotic, diet

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