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Cardiac resynchronization therapy in a young patient with Duchenne muscular dystrophy

Authors Kono T, Ogimoto A, Nishimura K, Yorozuya T, Okura T, Higaki J

Received 28 April 2015

Accepted for publication 30 June 2015

Published 21 August 2015 Volume 2015:8 Pages 173—175

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/IMCRJ.S87512

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Professor Ronald Prineas


Tamami Kono,1 Akiyoshi Ogimoto,1 Kazuhisa Nishimura,1 Toshihiro Yorozuya,2 Takafumi Okura,1 Jitsuo Higaki1

1Department of Cardiology, Pulmonology, Hypertension and Nephrology, 2Department of Anesthesiology and Resuscitology, Ehime University Graduate School of Medicine, Toon, Ehime, Japan

Abstract: A 32-year-old man with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) was admitted to the hospital because of worsening dyspnea and general fatigue. He had received medication therapy for cardiomyopathy with heart failure and home mechanical ventilation for respiratory failure. An electrocardiogram on admission showed intermittent third-degree atrioventricular block. Echocardiography showed global mild left ventricular systolic dysfunction with dyssynchrony (ejection fraction: 45%). He underwent implantation of a cardiac resynchronization therapy–defibrillator. His B-type natriuretic peptide level was improved after cardiac resynchronization therapy–defibrillator implantation, and he remains asymptomatic. The incidence of cardiomyopathy increases with age. By adulthood, 100% of patients have cardiac involvement.

Keywords: cardiac resynchronization therapy, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, progression of cardiomyopathy, heart failure, arrhythmia

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