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Biofabrication and biomaterials for urinary tract reconstruction

Authors Elsawy MM, de Mel A

Received 10 November 2016

Accepted for publication 15 March 2017

Published 10 May 2017 Volume 2017:9 Pages 79—92

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/RRU.S127209

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Akshita Wason

Peer reviewer comments 4

Editor who approved publication: Dr Jan Colli


Moustafa M Elsawy,1–3 Achala de Mel1

1Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, Royal Free Hospital, NHS Trust, University College London (UCL), 2Division of Reconstructive Urology, University College London Hospitals (uclh), London, UK; 3Urology Department, School of Medicine, Alexandria, University, Alexandria, Egypt

Abstract: Reconstructive urologists are constantly facing diverse and complex pathologies that require structural and functional restoration of urinary organs. There is always a demand for a biocompatible material to repair or substitute the urinary tract instead of using patient’s autologous tissues with its associated morbidity. Biomimetic approaches are tissue-engineering tactics aiming to tailor the material physical and biological properties to behave physiologically similar to the urinary system. This review highlights the different strategies to mimic urinary tissues including modifications in structure, surface chemistry, and cellular response of a range of biological and synthetic materials. The article also outlines the measures to minimize infectious complications, which might lead to graft failure. Relevant experimental and preclinical studies are discussed, as well as promising biomimetic approaches such as three-dimensional bioprinting.

Keywords: reconstruction, biofunctionalization, tissue engineering, urinary tract

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