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Association between inflammation-based prognostic scores and in-hospital outcomes in elderly patients with acute myocardial infarction

Authors Wang R, Wen X, Huang C, Liang Y, Mo Y, Xue L

Received 2 May 2019

Accepted for publication 12 June 2019

Published 4 July 2019 Volume 2019:14 Pages 1199—1206

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/CIA.S214222

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Bik-Wai Bilvick Tai

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Dr Zhi-Ying Wu


Rui Wang,1 Xiaodan Wen,2 Cheng Huang,1 Yingcong Liang,1 Yujing Mo,1 Ling Xue1

1Department of Cardiology, Guangdong Cardiovascular Institute, Guangdong Provincial People’s Hospital, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Geriatrics, Guangdong Geriatrics Institute, Guangdong Provincial People’s Hospital, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China

Objective: Emerging evidence suggests that systemic inflammation is a predictor of poor prognosis in acute myocardial infarction (AMI). In this study, we sought to assess whether inflammation-based prognostic scores are associated with in-hospital outcomes in elderly patients with AMI.
Methods: In this retrospective study, patients who were over 75-years-old and met the diagnostic criteria for AMI were consecutively recruited from January 1, 2016, to March 31, 2019. Logistic regression and receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analyses were performed to evaluate the predictive value of the inflammation-based Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS), Prognostic Index (PI) and Prognostic Nutritional Index (PNI).
Results: A total of 273 patients were enrolled. The incidence of major cardiovascular adverse events (MACEs) and mortality during hospitalization increased significantly with increasing GPS and PI scores. Multiple logistic regression showed that the GPS was independently associated with MACEs (score 1, RR: 6.711, 95% CI: 1.409–31.968; score 2, RR: 14.063, 95% CI: 3.018–65.535) and mortality (score 1, RR: 8.656, 95% CI: 1.068–70.126; score 2, RR: 10.549, 95% CI: 1.317–84.465). The PI was also independently predictive of MACEs (score 2, RR: 5.132, 95% CI: 1.451–18.148). No significant difference was observed in the PNI between patients with different in-hospital outcomes. When in-hospital MACEs were used as an endpoint, the area under the curve (AUC) of the GPS was 0.740 (95% CI 0.678–0.802), and the AUC of the PI was 0.703 (95% CI 0.634–0.773). When mortality was used as an endpoint, the AUC of the GPS was 0.677 (95% CI 0.602–0.753), and the AUC of the PI was 0.667 (95% CI 0.577–0.757).
Conclusion: The severity of systemic inflammation is a strong predictor of poor prognosis in elderly patients with AMI. Among these three inflammation-based prognostic scores, the GPS has a better predictive value than the PI and PNI for in-hospital MACEs and mortality.

Keywords: inflammation-based prognostic scores, acute myocardial infarction, elderly patients


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