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Review of long-term adverse effects associated with the use of chemically-modified animal and nonanimal source hyaluronic acid dermal fillers

Authors Paul C Edwards, John E Fantasia

Published Date January 2007 Volume 2007:2(4) Pages 509—519

DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CIA.S382

Published 3 January 2007

Paul C Edwards1, John E Fantasia2

1Associate Professor (Clinical), Department of Periodontics and Oral Medicine, Pathology and Oncology, University of Michigan School of Dentistry, Ann Arbor MI, USA; 2Chief, Division of Oral Pathology, Department of Dental Medicine, Long Island Jewish Medical Center, New Hyde Park, NY, USA

Abstract: Although only recently introduced, chemically-modified hyaluronic acid dermal fillers have gained widespread acceptance as “redefining” dermal fillers in the fields of dermatology and cosmetic facial surgery. Although hyaluronic acid-based dermal fillers have a low overall incidence of long term side effects, occasional adverse outcomes, ranging from chronic lymphoplasmacytic inflammatory reactions to classic foreign body-type granulomatous reactions have been documented. These long-term adverse events are reviewed.

Keywords: hyaluronic acid, Restylane®, Hylaform®, injectable dermal filler, foreign body reaction, granuloma

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