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Anxiety and depression in patients with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency: current insights and impact on quality of life

Authors Beiko T, Strange C

Received 13 March 2019

Accepted for publication 13 June 2019

Published 31 July 2019 Volume 2019:15 Pages 959—964

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/TCRM.S175369

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Melinda Thomas

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Professor Garry Walsh


Tatsiana Beiko, Charlie Strange

Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA

Abstract: Chronic physical illness is associated with significant vulnerability for emotional disorders. Some studies suggest anxiety and depression are common comorbidities in individuals with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD). Many aspects of AATD contribute to quality of life impairment. Delays in diagnosis, high costs of disease treatment, and inherited genetic risk add to the symptom burden of lung or liver disease to alter quality of life. Whether anxiety and depression independently contribute to quality of life impairment remains unproven. In this article, we aim to review current literature examining the impact of anxiety and depression on the quality of life of AATD-affected individuals. Multifaceted approaches may best meet the needs of a heterogeneous population and are the best future strategies to minimize these emotional impacts and assure highest quality of life possible. More research studies are needed to achieve this ambitious goal and make life of AATD-affected individuals better by minimizing the effects of anxiety and depression.

Keywords: anxiety, depression, alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency


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