Back to Journals » Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management » Volume 14

An unusual successful treatment with non-sulfonamides: primary cutaneous nocardiosis caused by Nocardia brasiliensis

Authors Chen N, Qin Q, Sun KD, Luo D, Cheng QH

Received 25 March 2018

Accepted for publication 21 June 2018

Published 10 September 2018 Volume 2018:14 Pages 1661—1664

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/TCRM.S169239

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Cristina Weinberg

Peer reviewer comments 3

Editor who approved publication: Professor Deyun Wang


Nian Chen, Qin Qin, Ke-Dai Sun, Dan Luo, Qiong-Hui Cheng

Department of Dermatology, Daping Hospital, Army Medical University, Chongqing 400042, China

Introduction: Primary cutaneous nocardiosis is a rare suppurative or granulomatous inflammation disease caused by Nocardia infection. Because of nonspecific clinical findings, it is always misdiagnosed as common pyogenic infection. Sulfonamides have been the standard treatment for nocardiosis, but the outcome is always poor due to the high rates of misdiagnosis and refractoriness of the disease.
Cases presentations: The presented cases are patients of acute suppurative cutaneous infection without involvement of other organs. We report four cases, of which two cases were localized cutaneous nocardiosis and the other two were lymphocutaneous type of nocardiosis. All cases were diagnosed with pus culture which turned out to be Nocardia brasiliensis. We report an improvement of primary cutaneous nocardiosis symptoms in the four patients treated with non-sulfonamides. All patients were cured and recovered without recurrence during follow-up.
Conclusion: Our results suggest that non-sulfonamides are effective treatment for the patients with primary cutaneous nocardiosis who are resistant or intolerant to sulfonamides.

Keywords: primary cutaneous nocardiosis, treatment, non-sulfonamides

Creative Commons License This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution - Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License. By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. For permission for commercial use of this work, please see paragraphs 4.2 and 5 of our Terms.

Download Article [PDF]  View Full Text [HTML][Machine readable]