Back to Journals » Clinical Ophthalmology » Volume 8

An analysis of ophthalmology trainees' perceptions of feedback for cataract surgery training

Authors Saedon H

Received 25 September 2013

Accepted for publication 12 November 2013

Published 12 December 2013 Volume 2014:8 Pages 43—47

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S54979

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 4


Habiba Saedon

Birmingham Midland Eye Centre, Birmingham, West Midlands, UK

Objectives: To determine whether feedback for cataract surgery is perceived to be given to trainee ophthalmologists, the way in which any feedback is given, and what the trainee perceives to be the effect of feedback on their performance.
Design: Cross-sectional qualitative study.
Participants: Twelve trainee ophthalmologists at various levels of specialty training in the UK.
Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted via telephone or face to face. Interviews were transcribed and underwent thematic analysis using a qualitative software data package.
Main outcome measures: The importance of feedback to the trainee and methods to improve the giving of feedback.
Results: Feedback was thought to be a useful tool for improving performance in cataract surgery by all participants. Emergent themes were the importance of specificity of feedback and having confidence in the supervisor. Participants suggested ways that the feedback given can be improved upon. An insight was gained into how the feedback has an effect on their performance.
Conclusion: This study showed that trainees perceive the feedback they receive to be of high quality. Feedback enables the trainees to self-reflect and improve their surgical techniques.

Keywords: postgraduate training, education, phacoemulsification, microsurgical skills, cognitive learning, reflection

Creative Commons License This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution - Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License. By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. For permission for commercial use of this work, please see paragraphs 4.2 and 5 of our Terms.

Download Article [PDF]  View Full Text [HTML][Machine readable]