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Ambulatory anesthetic care in pediatric tonsillectomy: challenges and risks

Authors Collins C

Received 23 March 2015

Accepted for publication 23 May 2015

Published 5 November 2015 Volume 2015:2 Pages 121—129

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/AA.S59818

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 4

Editor who approved publication: Dr Gildasio S De Oliveira Jr.

Corey Collins

Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Department of Anesthesiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA

Abstract: Pediatric tonsillectomy is a common surgery around the world. Surgical indications are obstructive sleep apnea and recurrent tonsillitis. Despite the frequency of tonsillectomy in children, most aspects of perioperative care are supported by scant evidence. Recent guidelines provide important recommendations although clinician adherence or awareness of published guidance is variable and inconsistent. Current guidelines establish criteria for screening children for post-tonsillectomy observation, though most are based on low-grade evidence or consensus. Current recommendations for admission are: age <3 years; significant obstructive sleep apnea; obesity; and significant comorbid medical conditions. Recent reports have challenged each criterion and recommend admission criteria that are based on clinically relevant risks or observed clinical events such as adverse respiratory events in the immediate recovery period. Morbidity and mortality are low though serious complications occur regularly and may be amenable to improvements in postoperative monitoring, improved analgesic regimens, and parental education. Careful consideration of risks attributable to individual patients is vital to determine overall suitability for ambulatory discharge.

Keywords: adverse airway events, complications, guidelines, mortality, OSA, pediatric anesthesia

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