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Airway obstruction caused by pharyngolaryngeal swelling after intraoral removal of a submandibular gland stone

Authors Sugiyama S, Iwai T, Ohashi N, Oguri S, Hirota M, Mitsudo K

Received 19 July 2018

Accepted for publication 4 November 2018

Published 27 November 2018 Volume 2018:14 Pages 2323—2325

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/TCRM.S180797

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Justinn Cochran

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Professor Garry Walsh


Satomi Sugiyama, Toshinori Iwai, Nobuhide Ohashi, Senri Oguri, Makoto Hirota, Kenji Mitsudo

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery/Orthodontics, Yokohama City University Hospital, Yokohama, Japan

Abstract: Intraoral removal of a submandibular gland stone is less invasive than submandibulectomy, with no life-threatening airway complications reported until now. We report a case involving airway obstruction caused by pharyngolaryngeal swelling after intraoral removal of a submandibular gland stone. A 31-year-old man with a left submandibular gland stone underwent intraoral removal of the stone under general anesthesia and was discharged 1 day after surgery. That night, he was transported back to our hospital by ambulance for dyspnea. Because computed tomography showed pharyngolaryngeal swelling, he was intubated and managed by a ventilator. Four days later, the pharyngolaryngeal swelling had mostly resolved and he was extubated and discharged. Surgeons should be vigilant of the potential risk of airway complications following an intraoral approach for submandibular gland stone removal.

Keywords: airway obstruction, intraoral removal, sialolithiasis, submandibular gland stone, complication

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