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Adherence ability of Staphylococcus epidermidis on prosthetic biomaterials: an in vitro study

Authors Shida T, Koseki H, Yoda I, Horiuchi H, Sakoda H, Osaki M

Received 24 July 2013

Accepted for publication 2 September 2013

Published 14 October 2013 Volume 2013:8(1) Pages 3955—3961

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/IJN.S51994

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 5

Takayuki Shida,1 Hironobu Koseki,1 Itaru Yoda,1 Hidehiko Horiuchi,1 Hideyuki Sakoda,2 Makoto Osaki1

1Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki, Japan; 2Division of Medical Devices, National Institute of Health Sciences, Tokyo, Japan

Abstract: Bacterial adhesion to the surface of biomaterials is an essential step in the pathogenesis of implant-related infections. In this in vitro research, we evaluated the ability of Staphylococcus epidermidis to adhere to the surface of solid biomaterials, including oxidized zirconium-niobium alloy (Oxinium), cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy, titanium alloy, commercially pure titanium, and stainless steel, and performed a biomaterial-to-biomaterial comparison. The test specimens were physically analyzed to quantitatively determine the viable adherent density of the S. epidermidis strain RP62A (American Type Culture Collection [ATCC] 35984). Field emission scanning electron microscope and laser microscope examination revealed a featureless, smooth surface in all specimens (average roughness <10 nm). The amounts of S. epidermidis that adhered to the biomaterial were significantly lower for Oxinium and the cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy than for commercially pure titanium. These results suggest that Oxinium and cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy are less susceptible to bacterial adherence and are less inclined to infection than other materials of a similar degree of smoothness.

Keyword: bacterial adhesion, implant, infection, surface character

Corrigendum for this paper has been published

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