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Successful alternative treatment for relapsed adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia with dendritic cells-cytokine-induced killer cells combined with a rituximab-based regimen

Authors Xiao X, Ye X, Xu C, Huang J

Received 17 June 2018

Accepted for publication 4 September 2018

Published 29 October 2018 Volume 2018:11 Pages 7555—7558

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/OTT.S177503

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Colin Mak

Peer reviewer comments 4

Editor who approved publication: Dr William Cho


XiaoFang Xiao, XingNong Ye, Cheng Xu, Jian Huang

Department of Hematology, The Fourth Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Zhejiang, China

Objective: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a malignant disease characterized by the accumulation of lymphoblasts, and a poor prognosis for adults with ALL is closely associated with disease recurrence. Thus far, treatment approaches have been limited, particularly in patients who are unable to tolerate chemotherapy. In this study, we report an effective treatment for such patients.
Materials and methods: A 52-year-old man diagnosed with Ph-negative B-precursor ALL went into remission after inductive treatment. Unfortunately, when he subsequently relapsed, severe complications drove him to refuse intensive chemotherapy. Instead, he received a cycle of dendritic cells-cytokine-induced killer cells (DC-CIK) before chemotherapy.
Result: The patient tolerated rituximab in combination with a vincristine, daunorubicin, l-asparaginase, and prednisone regimen without complications, and was in remission after DC-CIK infusion. After consolidation chemotherapy, including rituximab followed by eight cycles of DC-CIK, the patient has been free of leukemia for 2 years since the relapse.
Conclusion: This case of relapsed ALL was successfully treated with DC-CIK combined with a rituximab regimen.

Keywords: relapsed, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, DC-CIK, rituximab
 

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