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Identifying Suicidal Ideation Among Chinese Patients with Major Depressive Disorder: Evidence from a Real-World Hospital-Based Study in China

Authors Ge F, Jiang J, Wang Y, Yuan C, Zhang W

Received 12 November 2019

Accepted for publication 21 January 2020

Published 4 March 2020 Volume 2020:16 Pages 665—672

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/NDT.S238286

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewer comments 3

Editor who approved publication: Professor Yuping Ning


Fenfen Ge,1,* Jingwen Jiang,2,* Yue Wang,1 Cui Yuan,1 Wei Zhang1

1Mental Health Center of West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041, People’s Republic of China; 2West China Biomedical Big Data Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041, People’s Republic of China

*These authors contributed equally to this work

Correspondence: Wei Zhang
Mental Health Center of West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041, People’s Republic of China
Tel +86 18980601010
Email weizhanghx@163.com

Background: A growing body of research suggests that major depressive disorder (MDD) is one of the most common psychiatric conditions associated with suicide ideation (SI). However, how a combination of easily accessible variables built a utility clinically model to estimate the probability of an individual patient with SI via machine learning is limited.
Methods: We used the electronic medical record database from a hospital located in western China. A total of 1916 Chinese patients with MDD were included. Easily accessible data (demographic, clinical, and biological variables) were collected at admission (on the first day of admission) and were used to distinguish SI with MDD from non-SI using a machine learning algorithm (neural network).
Results: The neural network algorithm distinguished 1356 out of 1916 patients translating into 70.08% accuracy (70.68% sensitivity and 67.09% specificity) and an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.76. The most relevant predictor variables in identifying SI from non-SI included free thyroxine (FT4), the total scores of Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD), vocational status, and free triiodothyronine (FT3).
Conclusion: Risk for SI among patients with MDD can be identified at an individual subject level by integrating demographic, clinical, and biological variables as possible as early during hospitalization (at admission).

Keywords: depression, suicide ideation, real-world, machine learning


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