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Distribution Of Brain Metastasis From Lung Cancer

Authors Wang G, Xu J, Qi Y, Xiu J, Li R, Han M

Received 12 July 2019

Accepted for publication 15 October 2019

Published 1 November 2019 Volume 2019:11 Pages 9331—9338

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/CMAR.S222920

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Cristina Weinberg

Peer reviewer comments 2

Editor who approved publication: Dr Antonella D'Anneo


Guangyu Wang, Jiying Xu, Yana Qi, Jianjun Xiu, Ranran Li, Mingyong Han

Cancer Therapy and Research Center, Shandong Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan 250021, People’s Republic of China

Correspondence: Mingyong Han
Cancer Therapy and Research Center, Shandong Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, 324 Jingwuweiqi Road, Jinan 250021, People’s Republic of China
Tel +86 531 6877 2825
Fax +86 531 6877 2825
Email hanmingyong@sina.com

Purpose: The prognosis of lung cancer with brain metastasis is poor. The purpose of this study was to investigate the distribution of brain metastasis and explore its relationship with pathology and genetic mutations.
Patients and methods: Between June 2015 and July 2018, 335 patients from Shandong Provincial Hospital affiliated to Shandong University who had been firstly diagnosed with brain metastasis from lung cancer were retrospectively reviewed. All metastatic lesions were detected in the corresponding area using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).
Results: A total of 2046 metastatic lesions were found. Of the 335 patients, 21.2% (71/335) had a single brain metastasis and 78.8% (264/335) had multiple lesions. The cerebellum (56%; 189/335), right parietal lobe (54%; 182/335), right frontal lobe (47%; 157/335), and left frontal lobe (45%; 152/335) were the regions with the highest incidence of brain metastasis. The different pathological types of lung cancer showed different distribution of brain metastasis. In lung adenocarcinoma, the left frontal lobe (53%; 111/208), right frontal lobe (48%; 100/208) and cerebellum (56%; 116/208) exhibited higher brain metastases, while the cerebellum (61%; 45/74) and the right frontal lobe (46%; 34/74) had the highest incidence of brain metastasis from small-cell carcinoma. For lung squamous cell carcinoma, the cerebellum (70%; 14/20) was the most common site for metastasis. Adenocarcinoma was the most common pathological type in patients regardless of the number of lesions (ie, single or multiple brain metastases). Comparison of 37 cases with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene mutation versus 26 cases without mutations showed that there was no correlation between the distribution of brain metastasis and gene mutation.
Conclusion: The different pathological types of lung cancer demonstrate different distribution of brain metastasis. These findings may have significant implications in the diagnosis and treatment of brain metastasis from lung cancer.

Keywords: epidermal growth factor receptor, magnetic resonance imaging, pathology, gene mutations


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