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Depression symptoms in women with pelvic floor dysfunction: a case-control study

Authors Mazi B, Kaddour O, Al-Badr A

Received 13 September 2018

Accepted for publication 1 February 2019

Published 22 February 2019 Volume 2019:11 Pages 143—148

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/IJWH.S187417

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Cristina Weinberg

Peer reviewer comments 4

Editor who approved publication: Professor Elie Al-Chaer


Baraa Mazi,1 Ouhoud Kaddour,2,3 Ahmed Al-Badr2,4

1National Neurosciences Institute, King Fahad Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 2Research Center, King Fahad Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 3Prince Naif Healthcare Research Center, King Saud University Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 4Urogynecology & Pelvic Reconstructive Surgery Department, Women’s Specialized Hospital, King Fahad Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

Purpose: In this study, we aimed to estimate the prevalence of depression symptoms in women with pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD) and to assess their quality of life (QOL).
Patients and methods: A case-control study assessing depression and its severity in women with PFD (urinary incontinence, pelvic organ prolapse, and fecal incontinence) was conducted. Patients attending the Urogynecology Department of the Women’s Specialized Hospital, King Fahad Medical City, were requested to complete the self-reported Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory, Pelvic Floor Impact Questionnaire, and Beck Inventory Scale for Depression. Women presenting with no PFD symptoms were recruited from other clinics as controls.
Results: Data of 100 women diagnosed with PFD (mean age, 45.18±10.50 years) and 100 control participants (mean age, 45.14±13.03 years; P=0.644) were collected. Patients with PFD showed significantly higher (7.3%) body mass index (BMI) (32.59±6.22 kg/m2) than controls (30.37±8.08 kg/m2) (OR, 1.044, 95% CI: 1.001–1.091; P=0.043). Patients with PFD exhibited a threefold higher prevalence of depression symptoms than controls (43% vs 14%, respectively; P<0.001). QOL scores in patients with PFD were significantly higher in patients with depression (P-values, 0.024 to <0.001).
Conclusion: There is a significant association between depression and PFD, and QOL scores in patients with PFD were significantly higher in patients with depression.

Keywords: urinary incontinence, pelvic organ prolapse, fecal incontinence, Saudi Arabia
 

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