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Biomarkers for depression: recent insights, current challenges and future prospects

Authors Strawbridge R, Young AH, Cleare AJ

Received 1 February 2017

Accepted for publication 22 February 2017

Published 10 May 2017 Volume 2017:13 Pages 1245—1262

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/NDT.S114542

Checked for plagiarism Yes

Review by Single-blind

Peer reviewers approved by Dr Lucy Goodman

Peer reviewer comments 3

Editor who approved publication: Dr Roger Pinder


Rebecca Strawbridge,1 Allan H Young,1,2 Anthony J Cleare1,2

1Centre for Affective Disorders, Department of Psychological Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King’s College London, 2South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK

Abstract: A plethora of research has implicated hundreds of putative biomarkers for depression, but has not yet fully elucidated their roles in depressive illness or established what is abnormal in which patients and how biologic information can be used to enhance diagnosis, treatment and prognosis. This lack of progress is partially due to the nature and heterogeneity of depression, in conjunction with methodological heterogeneity within the research literature and the large array of biomarkers with potential, the expression of which often varies according to many factors. We review the available literature, which indicates that markers involved in inflammatory, neurotrophic and metabolic processes, as well as neurotransmitter and neuroendocrine system components, represent highly promising candidates. These may be measured through genetic and epigenetic, transcriptomic and proteomic, metabolomic and neuroimaging assessments. The use of novel approaches and systematic research programs is now required to determine whether, and which, biomarkers can be used to predict response to treatment, stratify patients to specific treatments and develop targets for new interventions. We conclude that there is much promise for reducing the burden of depression through further developing and expanding these research avenues.

Keywords: mood disorder, major depressive disorder, inflammation, treatment response, stratification, personalized medicine

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